leisure emerged as a response to peoples understanding of when service was

Leisure emerged as a response to peoples

This preview shows page 7 - 13 out of 28 pages.

– leisure emerged as a response to people’s understanding of when “service was required of them and other times when they were free to do more of what they wished” In many ways leisure is still defined this way.
Image of page 7
Plato and Aristotle Leisure became understood as “the freedom to move up” – to achieve your fullest potential and authenticity Plato – Greek Philosopher - founded the first institution of higher learning to teach people “the right use of leisure’s freedom” Contrasting leisure/work – Plato taught that too much work was unwise – why? And that idleness was equally unwise – why? The sign of an educated person was “active leisure” – playing sports, music, engaging in debate, doing philosophy – being concerned about betterment of self Goal of academic work was freedom (Liberal Arts included rhetoric, sciences, music, sports and gymnastics)
Image of page 8
The Rise and Fall of Leisure Leisure in the Middle Ages Continued understanding of work and leisure as means to an end However, within Feudalism and the Catholic Church began to change leisure’s role There was to be balance between Vita Activa & Vita Contemplativa (activities directed towards human needs such as acts of charity, public duties and necessary work and; activities of the mind and spirit directed toward God) Consequence was a new spiritual emphasis on work which lead to the Protestant Work Ethic
Image of page 9
The Rise of Work and Fall of Leisure Max Weber - The Protestant Work Ethic & The Spirit of Capitalism The coming of capitalism and the changing nature of work and leisure “One does not work to live; one lives to work” Middle Ages – the start of valuing work over leisure Benedictine Orders emphasis on manual work Vita Activa – activities that advanced spiritual discipline John Calvin, Puritanism and Leisure as the Devil’s workshop Lived under the notion that God decided who would be saved Placed importance on ”work as a spiritual end in itself” If people were willing to work hard then they might have a chance to be saved
Image of page 10
The Protestant Work Ethic as the The Spirit of Capitalism Puritans laid the basis for modern understanding of leisure that time off work is important as preparation for more work that time off work was time for rest and recuperation for more work (RECREATION) that time off work was for praying and raising the next generation of workers Other uses of leisure were trivial at best and very likely disreputable Capitalism “Capitalism’s everlasting economic activity and endorsement of unlimited acquisition depended upon the more fundamental valuing of work as an end in itself” (p.69) True believers” of capitalism – middle class and devotion to constant work Envisioned work for all without end.
Image of page 11
How is the Protestant work ethic still entrenched in how we view the purpose of work and leisure today?
Image of page 12
Image of page 13

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 28 pages?

  • Spring '18
  • Test, Leisure – Leisure

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes