Authors scagnetto fiorenza la terra di hope clinical

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Authors:Scagnetto, Fiorenza. La Terra di Hope, Clinical HealthPsychology Centre, Venice,Italy,[email protected]Poles, Giovanni. UOC Palliative Care, Venice, ItalyGuadagno, Carmine. Complex Veterinary Unit, HealthDepartment, Venice, ItalyNotari, Valentina. La Terra di Hope, Clinical Health PsychologyCentre, Venice, ItalyGiacopini, Nicola. IUSVE University Institute, Venice, ItalySource:The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol 26(9),Sep, 2020. pp. 843-844.Abstract:Presents a study which aims to examine moderating effect ofgender andpetownershipon anxiety anddepressionin animal-assistedintervention (AAI) to improve end-of-life care. The study was conducted on asample set of 44 patients, who were hospitalized in three palliative careOperative Units (O.U.) of the Aulss 3 Serenissima National HealthcareCentre, Venice, Italy. All the subjects enrolled were considered terminalpatients, according to the definition of Lamont, although not necessarilyaffected by cancer but also by other deadly pathologies. Most of the patientswerepetowners or had been in the past. A set of generalized linear modelswas used to assess the patients’ variations of anxietyanddepressionbefore and after the treatment, taking into account theinteractions with the variables gender andpetownership. Patients did notexpress significant variations in anxiety before and after the treatment, noteven when anxiety was correlated to gender. The same results emerged
10when the linear model was applied todepression: no significant variationwas found before and after the treatment also whendepressionwas put ininteraction with gender. The results changed when thevariablepetownershipwas correlated to anxiety ordepression. Theinteraction betweenpetownershipanddepressionremained non-significant, whereas it became significant whenpetownershipwascorrelated to anxiety. Interestingly, it is found that anxiety, after theinteraction with a dog, slightly decreased in patients who were or hadbeenpetowners, whereas it increased considerably in non-petowners.(PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)Release Date:20201005Correction Date:20201008DOI:Article 8:Title: Examining differences between homebound older adult pet ownersand non-pet owners in depression, systemic inflammation, and executivefunction.Authors:Branson, Sandy. University of Texas Health Science Center,School of Nursing, Houston, TX,US,[email protected]Boss, Lisa. University of Texas Health Science Center, School ofNursing, Houston, TX, USCron, Stanley. University of Texas Health Science Center,School of Nursing, Houston, TX, USKang, Duck-Hee. University of Texas Health Science Center,School of Nursing, Houston, TX, USSource:Anthrozoös, Vol 29(2), May, 2016. pp. 323-334.Abstract:Homebound older adults are prone to depression, which is linkedto systemic inflammation that promotes executive function decline. Acompanion animal may reduce the negative biobehavioral processes

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Term
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Harden Thicke

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