Research report - National Child Labour Action Programme for South Africa (1).doc

Individual ngos and community groups may institute

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Individual NGOs and community groups may institute them, but they will never be widespread or effective enough to be regarded as a national strategy. The following is proposed in this regard: (1) It may be possible to run effective income-generating projects for adults in very targeted areas where many children are involved in the worst forms of child labour. However, only sustainable projects should be supported. Lead institution: NGOs . New policy? Elaboration of existing policy. Once off cost: moderate. Recurrent cost: nil. Time line: to be introduced within one year of adoption of policy. ILO funding: to cover once off costs. Job creation for adults : The biggest opportunities for income-earning opportunities are the public works programmes. Income-generating projects could make a small contribution. The BCEA's blanket prohibition on employment of children should also encourage jobs for adults – see 7.2. Apart from these policy measures, the following is proposed:
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(2) One of the factors of deciding where to implement public works programmes should be areas where many children are involved in the worst forms of child labour. Lead institution: DPW; secondary institution: DL. New policy? Elaboration of existing policy. Once off cost: minimal. Recurrent cost: minimal. Time line: to be introduced within one year of adoption of policy. (3) Assessing the government's job-creation policy to ensure that the jobs created go to adults and not children. Lead institution: DTI; secondary institution: DL. New policy? Elaboration of existing policy. Once off cost: nil. Recurrent cost: minimal. Time line: to be introduced within one year of adoption of policy. 4.5 Impact of HIV/AIDS on child labour The HIV/AIDS pandemic has made children’s situations ever more precarious, and is therefore a major influence on child labour. Children whose parents become infected and later become ill and eventually die, are affected in many ways. Educational opportunities are compromised as children are withdrawn from school to care for ill family members, to care for siblings and to help with household chores where adults cannot do so any more, or to work to supplement family income. These issues are elaborated at 7.1. The Department of Education is planning to make a major intervention in this regard through an audit, curriculum training and drafting of a policy framework. Some stakeholders have recommended that children in households where their parents are ill, should be removed to shelters. Such an approach could create more problems that it may solve, and is presently against government policy. However, there may be circumstances where it may be best for the child to provide alternative care. The statistics on child work on which this document and the Discussion document rely are sourced primarily from a survey conducted in 1999. The prevalence of HIV/AIDS has increased significantly since that time and has almost certainly increased the incidence of many forms of child work and labour.
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