However both times she is not thinking of her

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towards whom she still feels a debt, and Alec ruthlessly takes advantage of this weakness to seduce her. After her father’s death,the family is evicted and becomes penniless. Tess, given a second chance, sacrifices her own peace of mind for the well being ofher relatives: “My little sisters and brothers and my mother's needs - they were the things you moved me by...and you said myhusband would never come back - never!” Until the moment of her final crime, Tess is prepared to suffer for others, to the extent of abandoning all hope of personalhappiness with Angel; yet her most altruistic actions are perversely seen by society as evidence of her immorality. Because ofher sacrificial attitude, Tess becomes a natural scapegoat, and those around her find it easy to shake off their ownresponsibilities. In the very beginning of the novel she is propelled from her sheltered existence into the clutches of Alec,because she wrongly feels entirely responsible for the death of the family's horse and thinks it her duty to support the familyafter this catastrophe. Similarly, it is out of respect for Angel's preposterous wishes that she refrains from writing to him in Brazil
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to tell him how she misses him, until it is too late. Furthermore, it is because she can sense an air of reproach in her family whenshe returns home for the second time that she casts herself out and endures physical hardship and mental pain at Flint comb-Ash.Her sensitivity to others' emotions undoubtedly plays a central role in the ruination of her life, and so in absolute terms Tess is atleast partly responsible for her fate. There is a slight suggestion in Hardy's writing that Tess's stoicism is derived from pride and self-righteousness. When Angelhypocritically rejects her on account of her past, "if Tess had been artful, had she made a scene, fainted, wept hysterically...hewould probably not have withstood her", the narrator comments, “Pride, too, entered into her submission - which perhaps was asymptom of that reckless acquiescence in chance too apparent in the whole d’Urbervilles family.” However, this is the onlyreference in the novel to any self-respect feelings in Tess, and until the bitter end she is depicted as unassuming, pragmatic, anddetermined not to give in to fate like her family or the other Talbot hays girls. It is because she worships Angel that she is proudnot to contradict him, in the same way martyrs are proud to be tortured for their God. Throughout the novel, then, Tess is shown to be pure in intention and selfless in all acts, until she surprisingly, spitefullymurders Alec. This is the single action that proves to be her ultimate downfall, a totally unnecessary crime of passion. Perhapsany other person in the same situation would have cracked much earlier, perhaps any other person would not have attempted toabide by the rules of personal morality for so long; nonetheless, Tess has no right to take Alec's life.
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