to decide how this harm can be reconciled that right belongs to those who

To decide how this harm can be reconciled that right

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to decide how this harm can be reconciled, that right belongs to those who experienced the harm (Blackstock, 2009). Practitioners should look to those who have been oppressed, marginalized, and victimized to work collaboratively to move forward and establish a practice the benefits those who need support (Blackstock, 2009). Conclusion The overrepresentation of Indigenous children in the child welfare system is a significant and ongoing issue in Canada. The statistics regarding this overrepresentation are staggering and only appear to be increasing. This overrepresentation has stemmed from a long history of cultural suppression since the colonization of Canada. Research outlines several factors that can increase the likelihood that an Indigenous family will be investigated and that child welfare services will apprehend a child. These factors include biases, organizational dynamics, and personal characteristics of child welfare workers. The majority of research focuses most heavily on the education, values, and cultural competence of the worker. Though research provided several factors that can lead to the overrepresentation of Indigenous children in the child welfare system few suggestions are provided on how to make apprehension practices more equitable. Future research is necessary on how to correct these disparities and to ensure that Indigenous families are treated with the same care and understanding as their non-Indigenous counterparts.
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  • Spring '16
  • Colonialism, Indigenous peoples of the Americas, Fallon, Aboriginal child protection

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