4 4 pts a few weeks ago we discussed issues of

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4. ( 4 pts ) A few weeks ago, we discussed issues of selective exposure and confirmation bias . Although the movie does not mention these concepts by name, it does discuss how both concepts have shaped the public’s interest in news and the manner in which news is disseminated and consumed. In what ways do you see these concepts described in the movie? Provide at least two examples. (1-3 sentences) In this movie, selective exposure is seen when a journalist is referring to issues such as war and peace, climate change, the growing inequality of rich and poor claiming that people care deeply about these topics and will be more inclined to read about it. In this movie I see confirmation bias in the example of Buzzfeed that they used “13 Ways You Know You’re From the Midwest” people will go to articles like these where if they answer yes the more certain they feel.
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5. ( 4 pts ) The movie discusses many ways that news is synthesized and simplified for a mass audience. Considering our discussions about scientific peer review and the (un)replicability of Amy Cuddy’s power posing work, what parallels do you see between the obstacles social scientists face in disseminating their work to the public and the obstacles journalists face in disseminating their work to the public? (1-2 paragraphs) In a social scientific view it goes through a peer review process which can be an issue. It can be a very slow process There’s a lot of bias that goes into deciding whether a study should be published, a personal bias and publication bias. Journals/editors want to publish exciting new findings. They don’t feel that negative or null findings are that interesting and replication studies are not a new thing so often will not publish that. For example, 99 researchers will conduct a study and find no relationship but don’t even send it out because they know of the biases that occur, while 1 researcher that conducts a study which in turn yields a relationship will get published even if it’s a fluke. I see some similarities in journalism, where a lot of trying to keep the audience interested is based on visual presentation. Front pages need to be
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  • Fall '18
  • Amy Goodman

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