This year the nanotechnology market could hit the us1

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This year, the nanotechnology market could hit the US$1 trillion mark and so the possible negative effects of nanotechnology, such as those mentioned, could easily be overlooked. Thus far, nanotechnology remains a science in its infancy. Its potential goes far beyond these products. It will affect virtually all of the devices and materials we deal with in everyday life, from consumer products to food to medicine. Novel nanostructures could serve as new kinds of drugs for treating common conditions such as cancer, Parkinson’s, and cardiovascular disease, or as artificial tissues for replacing diseased kidneys and livers. Dangerous side effects of current treatments (like chemotherapy) may be engineered away. Nano-engineered solar panels could produce many times more energy than current types, while being lighter and more durable. Nanotech batteries last longer and are lighter and more powerful than their current counterparts. Foods could be engineered to improve nutritional value, tasted, or shelf life. Closely related to the knowledge barrier is the technical barrier. In order for the incredible predictions regarding nanotechnology to come true, we have to find ways to mass produce nano-size products like transistors and nanowires. While we can use nanoparticles to build things like tennis rackets and make wrinkle-free fabrics, we can't make really complex microprocessor chips with nanowires yet. At the end of the day, nanotechnology is about doing things differently. Even though current applications of nanotechnology might seem rather crude, they are advancing what we can achieve in significant ways however leaving doubts and uncertainties in some cases. Future applications will become increasingly sophisticated, giving scientists and engineers the ability to tackle challenging problems that affect us all - including treating cancer, generating clean/renewable energy, and providing clean water anytime, anyplace. Inevitably, these new and emerging applications will raise important questions concerning how we develop safe and acceptable nanotechnologies. I believe that perhaps the greatest challenge to benefiting from nanotechnology is having the foresight to develop and use it wisely for the progression of mankind. References:
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"BBC News - IBM Researchers Make 12-atom Magnetic Memory Bit." BBC - Homepage . Web. 16 Jan. 2012. < ;. Bonson, K., and J. Strickland. How nanotechnology works . N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Jan 2012. < ;. Bonsor, Kevin, and Jonothan Strickland. "How Nanotchnolgy Works." How Stuff Works . N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Jan 2012. "Nanotechnology - Cleaning Up Our Water -- Chemical Engineers Call On Nanoparticles To Combat Polluted Groundwater." Science Daily: News & Articles in Science, Health, Environment & Technology .
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