Expanding the program to those schools would allow more eligible low income

Expanding the program to those schools would allow

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in other schools. Expanding the program to those schools would allow more eligible low-income students to reap the benefits of the SBP. Second, some students are unable or unwilling to participate in the SBP They may be unable to do so because the meals begin before their parents can bring them to school. They also may be unwilling to par- ticipate if the program is stigmatized as, say, being primarily for low-income students. In response, some schools have begun to have “breakfast in the classroom.” Because this program is available to all students, it lets more students participate and helps reduce the stigma associated with SBP. 104 THE FUTURE OF CHILDREN
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Food Assistance Programs and Child Health ENDNOTES 1. For reviews and considerations of these other interventions, see, for example, Mary Story, Diane Neumark- Sztainer, and Simone French, “Individual and Environmental Influences on Adolescent Eating Behaviors,” Journal of the American Dietetic Association 102 (2002): S40-51, doi: 10.1016/S0002-8223(02)90421-9; David Just and Brian Wansink, “Smarter Lunchrooms: Using Behavioral Economics to Improve Meal Selection, Choices 24, no. 3 (2009), ; Andrew S. Hanks et ah, “Healthy Convenience: Nudging Students Toward Healthier Choices in the Lunchroom,” Journal of Public Health 34 (2012): 370-76, doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fds003; Mary Kay Fox et al„ “Availability and Consumption of Competitive Foods in U.S. Public Schools,’’/onnwZ of the American Dietetic Association 109 (2009): S57-66, doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2008.10.063; Timothy Beatty, Biing-Hwan Lin, and Travis Smith, “Is Diet Quality Improving? Distributional Changes in the United States, 1989-2008,” American Journal of Agricultural Economics 96 (2014): 769-89, doi: 10.1093/ajae/aatl04. 2. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service, “National School Lunch Program: Participation and Lunches Served, , accessed August 2, 2014. 3. Existing research includes, for example, Jay Bhattacharya and Janet Currie, “Youths at Nutritional Risk: Malnourished or Misnourished?” in Risky Behavior Among Youths: An Economic Analysis, ed. Jonathan Gruber (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001), 483-522; Robert Breunig and Indraneel Dasgupta, “Do Intra-Household Effects Generate the Food Stamp Cash-Out Puzzle?” American Journal of Agricultural Economics 84 (2002): 552-68, doi: 10.1111/j.l467-8276.2005.00747.x; and Craig Gundersen and James Ziliak, “The Role of Food Stamps in Consumption Stabilization, "Journal of Human Resources 38 (2003): 1051-79. 4. For more on the history of SNAP as well as the National School Lunch Program, see Craig Gundersen, Food Assistance Programs and Food Security,” in The Oxford Handbook of the American Welfare State, ed. Daniel Beland, Christopher Howard, and Kimberly Morgan (New York: Oxford University Press 2014).
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