I apologize I did not stress the importance of including the child in these

I apologize i did not stress the importance of

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I apologize I did not stress the importance of including the child in these questions and I geared them as if I was only asking them to the parents. For children in the ages of preschool and early grades, it is very important to include them, and as some children may take a while to warm up to someone they are not familiar with, the Nurse Practitioner should use some warm-up activities to build a rapport with the child (Spence, Connor, Burke, Cheema, & Ostrosky, 2018). It is also important to keep questions short and simple for this age so the child can focus and answer basic questions, allowing the practitioner to tailor the assessment to the educational level (Spence, et al., 2018). In my initial post I posted my questions to the parents, but to the child I may ask the child if he/she likes to play games, what are favorite television shows, and what are favorite activities. I may also ask what he or she likes to eat and what are some favorite places to eat out. I could also tailor questions to even ask what the patient tkings are “yucky” foods. Reference: Spence, C. M., Connor, S. M., Burke, T., Cheema, J. R., & Ostrosky, M. M. (2018). Assessing Early Intervention Provider Needs. Infants & Young Children, 31 (1), 53- 68. doi:10.1097/iyc.0000000000000110 References Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., Flynn, J. A., Solomon, B. S., & Stewart, R. W. (2015). Seidel's guide to physical examination (8th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby. Fruh, S. M. (2017). Obesity: Risk factors, complications, and strategies for sustainable long- term weight management. Journal Of The American Association Of Nurse Practitioners , 29 S3.
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doi:10.1002/2327-6924.12510 Koyuncuoğlu Güngör, N. (2014). Overweight and Obesity in Children and Adolescents. Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology , 6 (3), 129– 143. /jcrpe.1471 Nierengarten, M. B. (2018). Prediabetes: How to identify children at risk: Children who are overweight or obese are potentially at risk for developing diabetes, but there's more to identifying prediabetes than just obesity. Contemporary Pediatrics , (5). 22. Hi Joy, Thank you for sharing your discussion. Physical activity and sedentary behaviors are key factors to preventing obesity. Studies show that children who are exposed to the same environmental factors for obesity will either become obese or stay within their weight range (Bryan, et. al., 2017). You mentioned in your discussion the important of assessing for nutritional and activity status in the home environment. It is important to integrate areas that influence a child’s obesity risk. For example, physical activity, nutrition, education, and family engagement play a crucial role in obesity prevention (CDC, 2018). Overweight is classified as being at or above the 95 th percentile of body mass index (BMI) (Sahoo, 2015). Although BMI does not interpret between large muscle or bone features, other measures such as waist circumference and skin-fold thickness are better indicators in children (Sahoo, 2015). Gathering information from the parents and the child requires the practitioner to ask appropriate and meaning questions. It’s important to address any
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