Federalist chief justice of pennsylvania thomas

This preview shows page 12 - 14 out of 17 pages.

Federalist chief justice of Pennsylvania, Thomas McKean, in effigy; put the torch to a  copy of the Constitution; and busted a few Federalist heads. In New York the Constitution was under siege in the press by a series of essays signed  "Cato." Mounting a counterattack, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay enlisted help from  Madison and, in late 1787, they published the first of a series of essays now known as  the Federalist Papers. The 85 essays, most of which were penned by Hamilton himself,  probed the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and the need for an energetic  national government. Thomas Jefferson later called the  Federalist Papers  the "best  commentary on the principles of government ever written." Against this kind of Federalist leadership and determination, the opposition in most  states was disorganized and generally inert. The leading spokesmen were largely state- centered men with regional and local interests and loyalties. Madison wrote of the  Massachusetts anti-Federalists, "There was not a single character capable of uniting  their wills or directing their measures. . . . They had no plan whatever." The anti- Federalists attacked wildly on several fronts: the lack of a bill of rights, discrimination  against southern states in navigation legislation, direct taxation, the loss of state  sovereignty. Many charged that the Constitution represented the work of aristocratic  politicians bent on protecting their own class interests. At the Massachusetts convention one delegate declared, "These lawyers, and men of learning and moneyed men,  that . . . make us poor illiterate people swallow down the pill . . . they will swallow up all  us little folks like the great Leviathan; yes, just as the whale swallowed up Jonah!" Some 12
newspaper articles, presumably written by anti-Federalists, resorted to fanciful  predictions of the horrors that might emerge under the new Constitution pagans and  deists could control the government; the use of Inquisition-like torture could be instituted as punishment for federal crimes; even the pope could be elected president. One anti-Federalist argument gave opponents some genuine difficulty--the claim that  the territory of the 13 states was too extensive for a representative government. In a  republic embracing a large area, anti-Federalists argued, government would be  impersonal, unrepresentative, dominated by men of wealth, and oppressive of the poor  and working classes. Had not the illustrious Montesquieu himself ridiculed the notion  that an extensive territory composed of varying climates and people, could be a single  republican state? James Madison, always ready with the Federalist volley, turned the 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture