Key Stakeholders How do you ensure success of unit based practice change Key

Key stakeholders how do you ensure success of unit

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Key Stakeholders How do you ensure success of unit-based practice change? Key stakeholders need to have a buy-in in order to fully integrate and safeguard a triumph with a departmental transformation. The emergency department key stakeholders include registered nurses and patient support staff, physician and mid-level providers, emergency department administration, and the patients. Registered nurses will provide patient education, teaching instructions, and follow up appointments. This group will also ensure the patient is able to teach-back relevant material and education prior to discharge. The role support staff will need to provide patients with is the gathering of supplies for at home care (ice bags, wound supplies, and ambulatory aids). Emergency room physicians and mid-level providers will ensure patient specific education and instructions are entered in the electronic medical record, before patient education can take place. Administration will play the role of support for staff and patients alike throughout the change process by enacting new policies and quality control with the new educational process. Lastly the patients will operate as stakeholders by participating teach back discharge education and asking appropriate questions when there is a misunderstanding. Evidence Critique Table Full APA citation for at least 5 sources Evidence Strength (1-7) and Evidence Hierarchy 1 . Almkuist, K. D. (2017). Using teach-back method to prevent 30-day readmissions in patients with heart failure: A systematic review. MEDSURG Nursing, 26(5), 309. Level I
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C301: TASK ONE 4 Retrieved from - bin/WebObjects/MSNJournal.woa Integrative Review 2. Foster, J., Idossa, L., Lih-Wen, M., & Murphy, E. (2016). Applying Health Literacy Principles: Strategies and Tools to Develop Easy-to-Read Patient Education Resources. Clinical Journal Of Oncology Nursing , 20 (4), 433-436. doi: 10.1188/16.CJON.433-436 Level VII Expert Opinion 3. Griffey, R. T., Shin, N., Jones, S., Aginam, N., Gross, M., Kinsella, Y., Kaphingst, K. A. (2015). The impact of teach-back on comprehension of discharge instructions and satisfaction among emergency patients with limited health literacy: A randomized, controlled study. Journal of Communication in Healthcare , 8 (1), 10–21. - org.wgu.idm.oclc.org/10.1179/1753807615Y.0000000001 Level II RCT 4 . Sheikh, H., Brezar, A., Dzwonek, A., Yau, L., & Calder, L. A. (2018). Patient understanding of discharge instructions in the emergency department: do different patients need different approaches? International Journal Of Emergency Medicine , 11 (1), 5. - org.wgu.idm.oclc.org/10.1186/s12245-018-0164-0 Level IV Non-Experimental 5. Wood, E. B., Harrison, G., Trickey, A., Friesen, M. A., Stinson, S., Rovelli, E., … Presgrave, K. (2017). Practice Improvement: Evidence-Based Practice: Video-Discharge Instructions in the Pediatric Emergency Department. Journal of Emergency Nursing , 43 , 316–321. Level III Quasi-Experimental Note: Evidence Strength will range from level 7 (lowest) to level 1 (highest). Evidence Hierarchy will reflect the research methodology (Expert Opinion [lowest] to Meta-Analysis [highest]).
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C301: TASK ONE 5 Evidence Summary To truly gather momentum and initiate change, the master’s degree prepared nurse will
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  • Spring '16
  • erinsmith
  • Nursing, Journal of Emergency Nursing

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