Most damaging long term effects occurs a Coerced sex b Repeated sexual contact

Most damaging long term effects occurs a coerced sex

This preview shows page 5 - 9 out of 47 pages.

Most damaging long term effects occurs: a.Coerced sex b.Repeated sexual contact c.Incest d.Sexual penetration j.Child sexual abuse prevention programs a.Good touch bad touch program
Background image
Key Terms The cognitive dimension The social (Interpersonal) dimension The gender dimension The orientation dimension Erotic dimension Bar Mitvah / Bat Mitvah Quinceanera Super peer theory Virginity pledge programs Abstinence-only programs Comprehensive sex education programs Intergenerational sex Child sexual abuse
Background image
Chapter 13 Sexual Development from Adulthood Through Old Age 1.Forms and functions of marriage a.Right to have children i.Many cultures permit only married couples to bear and raise a child 1.Give power to control who can be a parent b.Ownership of property and inheritance i.Inherited property is traditionally passed down from one spouse to another ii.View females as male property 1.Marriage marks the transfer of the female from father to the new husband c.Social stability i.Respect the sexual exclusivity of the marital relationship ii.Reduce the social friction and make paternity more certain iii.Makes it difficult for a couple to separate 1.Stability to the relationship and to the family during child rearing years d.Kinship networks i.Make bonds among extended family 2.History of passionate love a.Love emerges as the social ideal in the 1500s i.West diverges from rest of the world b.The rise of individualism, democracy reinforces romantic love as basis of marriage c.Bloom of democracy love marriage sweeps the world 3.Marital Forms a.Monogamy i.Sexual relationship that involves two people ii.Can only remarry if marriage ends in divorce or death iii.Bigamy person who is married and marries a second spouse iv.Most common in industrialized societies b.Polygamy i.Involving more than two partners in a marriage ii.More common in agrarian societies iii.Polygyny 1.Male married to multiple females iv.Concubines 1.Not the first wife 2.Will occupy a role of less importance 3.Socially accepted but not legally recognized
Background image
4.Children of concubines have no permanent attachment to the household and are not entitled to inherit v.Harems 1.Traditionally watched over by eunuchs who were castrated males 2.Separate household reserved for wives, concubines, and female servants vi.Polyandry 1.Females with multiple husbands 4.Marriage a.Changing trends i.From basic needs to self-actualization ii.The Institutional Model of Marriage (late 1700s to 1850s) “The Practical Marriage” 1.Goals of marriage was mostly rooted in practicality and survival 2.Relied on each other for basic needs 3.Notion of marrying for love was indulgent and impractical 4.Marriage was highly regulated by law, social norms, and religion iii.The Companionate Model of Marriage (1850-1965) “The Breadwinner-Homemaker Marriage) 1.Wives tend to do domestic home-life while husband went to work 2.Marriage begin to occur to bring happiness to
Background image
Image of page 9

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture