5 I think Broyard casts his discussion in such poetic language to create a

5 i think broyard casts his discussion in such poetic

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5). I think Broyard casts his discussion in such poetic language to create a sense of parallelism with the topic. To me, I never really understood the history behind hipsters and I never would have understood the information in the essay if I did not look up most of the words within it like the word “inchoate” (Broyard para. 2). 6). In my eyes, the author portrays hipsters as jazz loving people who like to follow the beat of their own music simultaneously. There re still people like this around, but today when
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McCormick 2 someone says hipster, most people would envision a person with maybe a lot of colors on, they might have on a peace necklace or colorful shades, they might drive a Volkswagen van, etc. “Making Butch: An Historical Memoir of the 1970s”, by Sue-Ellen Case 1). The bar scene in the beginning of the essay and the bit about the coffee houses having a lesbian section shows how lesbians in the 1960s and 1970s had an outlaw status. 2). A “butch” could be a homosexual female who basically takes on the more masculine role. A “femme” could be a homosexual female who takes on the more “traditional” role of a woman, or the more feminine role. There is a different in how each dress most times also. A “butch” might wear clothes typically seen worn by a guy and a “femme” might dress more girly like in skirts, dresses, etc.
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  • Winter '14
  • Butch and femme, Anatole Broyard

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