In the 19th and 20th centuries great britain had the

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6. What were the effects of the Sepoy Rebellion? UNIT 12.2| Imperialism | SQ 4. How did the British gain, consolidate, and maintain power in India?
Categorize Corroborate Document Analysis Activity: How did the British gain, consolidate, and maintain power in India? Directions: Examine the documents on British power in India and annotate as you read by placing a “G” next to examples of methods that the British used to gain power in India, a “C” next to examples of methods they used to consolidate their power, and an “M” next to examples of methods used to maintain power and add information to this graphic organizer. Document Set 1 The British used their military might and advanced technology to conquer andkeep control of most parts of India. The British Indian Army was made up ofroughly two-thirds Indian soldiers hired to defend the British East IndiaCompany and later the British government’s interests, and just one-thirdBritish soldiers. The British held the highest positions in the military. With the addition of the Maxim Gun, the first widely used machine gun, themilitary was nearly unstoppable. The gun could fire bullet after bullet withoutreloading and could swivel from side to side. British Indian Army soldiers, 1895. Image is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is Public Domain Illustration of British Indian Army soldiers and their British commander, 1896. Image is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is Public Domain Maxim machine gun mounted on a Dundonald gun carriage, ca. 1890. Image is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is Public Domain UNIT 12.2| Imperialism | SQ 4. How did the British gain, consolidate, and maintain power in India?
Document Set 2 An enduring monument to British imperialism in India is the Indian railway system, which at the time of independence in 1947 had more track mileage than that of any European state and less than only the United States, Canada, and the Soviet Union. The first railway track was laid in India in 1850, and by 1915 India had better than forty thousand miles of track and approximately one hundred million railroad passengers per year. Indian railway building was supported by several powerful groups: British cotton manufacturers, for whom railways were a cheap and efficient way to get cotton to the coast for shipment to England; British industrialists, who supplied India with most of its rails, locomotives, moving stock [railroad cars], and equipment; colonial officials, who saw

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