without pulmonary surfactant to collapse and empty its air into larger alveolus

Without pulmonary surfactant to collapse and empty

This preview shows page 30 - 33 out of 68 pages.

(without pulmonary surfactant) to collapse and empty its air into larger alveolus Pulmonary surfactant reduces surface tension of smaller alveolus more than that of larger  alveolus; offsets the effect of the smaller radius in determining the inward-directed pressure    with surfactant small alveolus does not collapse Respiratory cycle: maximum air lungs can hold is 5.7 L in males and 4.2 L in females During quiet breathing, lungs remain moderately inflated throughout respiratory cycle
Image of page 30
Changes in lung volume can be determined by a spirometer TV: tidal volume  (.5L) IRV: inspiratory reserve volume (3L) IC: Inspiratory capacity (3.5 L) ERV: Expiratory reserve volume (1L) RV: Residual volume (1.2 L) FRC: Functional residual capacity (2.2 L) VC: Vital capacity (4.5 L) TLC: total lung capacity (5.7 L) Alveolar ventilation = (tidal volume – dead space) * respiratory rate Volume of air exchanged between atmosphere and alveoli per minute Partial pressures: individual pressure exerted independently by a particular gas within a mixture of  gases Gas exchange involves simple passive diffusion of O 2  and CO 2  down partial pressure gradients Partial pressure = (total pressure) * (percent of gas in mixture) Partial pressure of atmospheric N 2  = P N2  = 79% * 760 mm Hg =  600 mm Hg Partial pressure of atmospheric O 2  = P O2  = 21% * 760 mm Hg = 160 mm Hg Humidification (vapor saturation) of inspired air “dilutes” the P of inspired gases within the alveolus P water = 47 mm Hg; P Nitrogen  = 563 mm Hg; P oxygen 150 mm Hg Because humidification and small turnover of alveolar air (at end of inspiration, only ~13% of air in alveoli is fresh air) the alveolar P O2   = 100 mm Hg
Image of page 31
Alveolar P O2  remains around 100 mm Hg throughout respiratory cycle Blood returning to lungs from tissues still contains O 2  (P O2  of systemic venous blood = 40 mm  Hg; P CO2  of blood leaving lungs = 40 mm Hg) Gas exchange Net diffusion of O 2  occurs between alveoli and blood, then between blood and tissues as result of O 2  partial pressure gradients Net diffusion of CO 2  occurs between tissues and blood, then between blood and alveoli as result  of CO 2  partial pressure gradients O 2  and CO exchange across capillaries caused by partial pressure gradients Alveolar P O2  is high and alveolar P CO2  is low – portion of alveolar air is exchanged for fresh  atmospheric air with each breath Blood P O2  in lungs   pulmonary vein   systemic arterial circulation   body tissue = ~100 mm Hg P;  blood P O2  in pulmonary   systemic tissues 
Image of page 32
Image of page 33

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture