Obviously color would be immaterial without some form of illumination

Obviously color would be immaterial without some form

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Obviously, color would be immaterial without some form of illumination. Additionally, lighting may be colored itself. Certain colored lights have been found to be associated with particular emotional responses. Red lights are often related to danger, pale yellow lights to contentment, pale green with kindness, green with death, peacock blue with sinister things, orange with warmth and excitement, blue with quiet, violet with delicacy, and lavender with wistfulness. Behavior is affected not only by the color of lighting, but also by its intensity. High illuminations of gold and pink lighting produce a festive atmosphere, whereas subdued lighting, particularly blue, tends to elicit a somber mood. Lighting that is too blue and subdued can actually create drowsiness. Some studies have explored the effects of bright & dim lighting. 1 study placed subjects into a room with either bright lighting or dim lighting for a period of 1 hour. Subjects were
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allowed to do whatever they pleased. Each room contained 4 females & 4 males, & both rooms were the same size: 10 feet by 12 feet. The results showed that verbal output was strikingly different in 2 rooms. In the brightly lit room, a continuous stream of speech was maintained; whereas in the dimly lit room, almost all talking had stopped after about 30 minutes. Some have suggested that bright lighting and dim lighting differentially influence perceptions of intimacy & relaxation ( Carr & Dabbs, 1974 ; Gergen, ergen, & Barton, 1973 ). Low lighting makes people want to linger because the environment is more relaxing; whereas, extremely bright lighting may produce fatigue or create a desire to escape. Dim lighting, coupled with intimate questions among nonintimates, has been found to produce hesitancy during responses, reduced eye contact, & a significant decrease in the duration of gaze ( Carr & Dabbs, 1974 ). Temperature and the Environment Based on the research on environmental temperature, researchers have concluded that 62 to 68 degrees Fahrenheit may be the optimal temperature for indoor environments. Knapp ( 1980 ) has provided an excellent summary of the research that has been conducted. He reports that Huntington ( 1915 ) advanced a seemingly bizarre theory in the early twentieth century that an average outdoor temperature of 50 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit is better than one above 70 degrees (p. 58 ). According to Knapp, the experts have suggested the following effects of weather on human behavior: 1. Monotonous weather is more apt to affect your spirits. 2. Seasonally, you do your best mental work in late winter, early spring, and fall. 3. A prolonged blue sky reduces your productivity. 4. The ideal temperature should average about 64 degrees Fahrenheit (p. 58 ). In his book The Achieving Society , McClelland ( 1976 ) reported that achievement motivation appears greatest in societies where the average yearly temperature is between 40 & 60 degrees Fahrenheit. McClelland also suggested that a variation of at least 15 degrees, either daily or seasonally, produced high achievement motivation. Other studies have suggested that temperature and aggression are related. We may be more likely to act aggressively in
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