Priority rules o according to the principle of

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Priority Rules:
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o According to the principle of federal supremacy, the US constitution, federal laws enacted pursuant to it, and treaties are the supreme law of the land. This means that federal law defeats conflicting state law. o Constitutions defeat other types of law within their domain. A state constitution defeats all other state laws inconsistent with it. The US Constitution defeats inconsistent laws of whatever type. o When a treaty conflicts with a federal statute over a purely domestic manner, the measure that is later in time usually prevails. o Within either the state or the federal domain, statutes defeat conflicting laws that depend on a legislative delegation for their validity. o Statutes and any laws derived from them by delegation defeat inconsistent common law rules. Either a statute or an administrative regulation defeats a conflicting common law rule. Three common classifications of law cut across the different types of law. These classifications involve distinctions between 1) criminal and civil law, 2) substantive law and procedural law, and 3) public and private law. o Criminal law is the law under which the government prosecutes someone for committing a crime. It creates duties that are owed to the public as a whole. o Civil law mainly concerns obligations that private parties owe to each other. o Sometimes the same behavior might violate both laws. o Substantive law sets the rights and duties of people as they act in society. o Procedural law controls the behavior of government bodies (mainly courts) as they establish and enforce rules of substantive law. o Public law concerns the powers of government and the relations between government and private parties. o Private law establishes a framework of legal rules that enables parties to set the rights and duties they owe each other. The various types of law sometimes are called positive law . Positive law compromises the rules that have been laid down by a recognized political authority. The field of jurisprudence seeks to define law properly. One feature common to all types of law is their enactment by a governmental authority such as a legislature or an administrative agency. This feature underlies the definition of law adopted by the school of jurisprudence known as legal positivism. Legal positivists define law as the command of a recognized political authority. Natural law takes issue with legal positivism by rejecting the positivist separation of law and morality. Natural law adherents usually contend that some higher law or set of universal moral rules binds all human beings in all times and places. American legal realism defines law as the behavior of public officials (mainly judges) as they deal with matters before the legal system.
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