For the most part the authors confined their analysis to the Journal of

For the most part the authors confined their analysis

This preview shows page 2 - 3 out of 10 pages.

For the most part, the authors confined their analysis to the Journal of Advertising Research . Relevant research from other advertising ( Journal of Advertising , Interna- tional Journal of Advertising , Journal of Cur- rent Issues and Research in Advertising ) and marketing journals ( Journal of Marketing , Journal of Marketing Research , and Market- ing Science ) also has been integrated to pro- vide a more comprehensive perspective. The authors limited their analysis to newspapers and magazines defined as “press advertising”—advertising printed on physical paper, placed and featured within the news, editorial, and entertain- ment content of a print vehicle. Research on other print media (i.e., Yellow Pages and other directories, outdoor, direct mail, and collateral) that serve as self-contained advertising platforms (i.e., ads are not placed to reach audiences attracted by vehicle content, the vehicle is advertising) is excluded. The research also excluded advertising associated with online ver- sions of newspapers and magazines and portable digital readers and tablets, such as the Kindle and the iPad. Although these new content-delivery mechanisms are essential for the future of the print indus- try, research on digital advertising is not reviewed here. Before turning to the research analysis, it is important to put the findings in his- torical context. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Over the years, there has been a signifi- cant decline in the percentage of total U.S. advertising spending accounted for by these two media. According to the U.S. Statistical Abstract (U.S. Census Bureau, 1971, 2009), spending on newspaper advertising as a percentage of total adver- tising spending declined from 30.8 percent in 1960 to about 13.2 percent in 2008 (i.e., last-year data available from the same source). Although national advertising in newspapers represented 6.5 percent of total advertising spending in 1960, it rep- resented only 2.2 percent in 2008. Maga- zine advertising spending dropped from 7.6 percent in 1960 to 4.8 percent in 2008. In total, the combined advertising spending in newspaper and magazine advertising as a percentage of total advertising spend- ing went from 38.4 percent to 18 percent in this 50-year period. There has also been a dramatic change in the number of newspapers published. In 1960, the U.S. Statistical Abstract (U.S. Census Bureau, 1971) reported the existence of 1,763 daily papers. By 2008, the number had declined to 1,408. The percentage of advertising content versus editorial content in newspapers has also decreased dramati- cally. Newspapers’ advertising-to-editorial ratio was 61 percent/39 percent in 1960 compared to 44 percent/56 percent in 2009. The nature of consumer magazines also has changed from the 1960s to the present day. Unlike newspapers, however, one- source data on the number of consumer magazines are not available from the 1960s. Data from the past decade indicate that the number of consumer magazines has varied greatly from year to year (Strip- lin, 2009). For example, there were 8,138 consumer magazines in 2000. By 2002, the number had dropped to 5,340. From 2003
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 10 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes