There may also be more overt causes of the

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There may also be more overt causes of the underrepresentation of female and minority tech employees. Consider results from an interview study of 716 women who had held technology positions. These women left the industry after seven years, and 27 percent cited “discomfort working in these companies.” Other top reasons were perceived discrimination in regard to gender, race, or sexual orientation, lack of flexible hours, and unsupportive work environments. 9
Could something as subtle as gender-based communication contribute to the problem? The answer is yes according to a recent report presented in Fortune . A study of 1,100 technology résumés from 512 men and 588 women uncovered gender-related differences that may affect a recruiter’s perceptions. For example, “women’s résumés are longer, but shorter on details. ... Yet when it comes to providing details about previous jobs, the men present far more specific content than the women do,” according to the Fortune report. Women were also found to “lead with their credentials and include more personal background. On average, the women’s résumés cite seven personal distinctions apiece, while the men’s cite four.” Overall, women tend to use more narrative while men are more precise about their experiences. 10 Assume you are a senior leader at a technology company. What does the information in this case tell you about managing diversity? Apply the Three-Step Problem-Solving Approach to OB Step 1: Define the problem. Look first at the Outcome box of the Organizing Framework in Figure 4.5 to help identify the important problem(s) in this case. Remember that a problem is a gap between a desired and current state. State your problem as a gap, and be sure to consider problems at all three levels. If more than one desired outcome is not being accomplished, decide which one is most important and focus on it for steps 2 and 3. Cases have protagonists (key players), and problems are generally viewed from a particular protagonist’s perspective. You need to identify the perspective—employee, manager, team, or the organization—from which you’re defining the problem. Use details in the case to identify the key problem. Don’t assume, infer, or create problems that are not included in the case.
To refine your choice, ask yourself, Why is this a problem? Explaining why helps refine and focus your thinking. Focus on topics in the current chapter, because we generally select cases that illustrate concepts in the current chapter. Step 2: Identify causes of the problem by using material from this chapter, which has been summarized in the Organizing Framework shown in Figure 4.5. Causes will appear in either the Inputs box or the Processes box. Start by looking at Figure 4.5 to identify which person factors, if any, are most likely causes of the defined problem. For each cause, explain why this is a cause of the problem. Asking why multiple times is more likely to lead you to root causes of the problem. For example, if you think demographics— an input in the Organizing Framework—is a cause,

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