HOOVER Great very nice Why dont you three come up and show your nice chart

Hoover great very nice why dont you three come up and

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HOOVER: Great, very nice. Why don't you three come up and show your nice chart there? STUDENT: We realized that out of the total population, a lot more people are living in the urban cities instead of the rural farmland, and as the years go on, urban areas are getting higher in population and the rural is getting lower. Because people are moving out of the rural areas to get jobs in the city. HOOVER: Okay, great. Nice job. Let's put this up. STUDENT: And some of the pull factors of what's pulling them into migrating is that the maquiladoras is where they get a chance to make bigger wages and bigger money so that they can send it back to their family. Some of the push factors are the "hollow core" where there was not very much work. All they could do was raise goats. Migrate to Mexico City, where it's Mexico's best job source. HOOVER: What types of things do they assemble in those plants? STUDENT: Um, Mattel. That's one of the brands. HOOVER: What does Mattel make? STUDENT: Toys. HOOVER: Toys, okay. STUDENT: Cars, the, uh, reflector lights. HOOVER: Okay, so kind of small plastic things. STUDENT: And then the TV, like, tubes. HOOVER: Mm-hmm, TVs, computers. If you look at a lot of the products that you have in your house, it might say "assembled in Mexico." NARRATOR: At class's end, Randy gives homework in the form of a writing
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assignment. Let's take a look at the writing assignment here. HOOVER: This is how we're going to sum all this up. Think about the big picture now: Overall, why do people migrate? This is a theme that we'll see in other parts of the world as well. It happens a lot in Latin America. It also happens in just about every other part of the world. It helps them, I think, bring it together at the end by some sort of a writing assignment referring back to the original question. In this case: Why do people migrate? They went through the steps of thinking about it, researching, organizing it, analyzing material, and then the written follow-up is the answer--their answer-- to that question. HOOVER: Feel free to bring in your own experience. If you've moved at some point, what kind of challenges did you face? How did you feel being in a new place? Feel free to add to it. Do the best you can with that tonight. Thank you.Nice job today. BINKO: There you have the benefits of two sources of content, Guatemala and Mexico, both rich in geographic perspectives on the human condition. Our teacher, Randy Hoover, effectively demonstrates how unifying geographic themes can be extrapolated from similar landscapes. He also illustrates how the national geography standards--in this case, Standard 4, dealing with the physical and human characteristics of places , and Standard 9, the characteristics, distribution and migration of human populations --can inform and guide classroom content. Note that the lesson requires students to think through issues systematically and with focused attention on one central inquiry question: Why do people migrate? We saw students collaborate in groups and engage in the inquiry process, organizing and analyzing data in order to answer a geographic question. By creating and working with maps, Randy's students gain skills with his important tool and develop a better understanding of the factors associated with migration.
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  • Spring '14

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