I watch amateur sports most weeks and always ask parents who see coaches

I watch amateur sports most weeks and always ask

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I watch amateur sports most weeks and always ask parents who see coaches screaming and spitting, shouting and grabbing their children whether they would tolerate that as "character-building" if it were a French or math teacher doing the same thing. Invariably, their faces change, and you see the Edited from the original. 1 Medieval [ informal ]: extremely old-fashioned; barbaric. 2 Hubris: over-confidence. 3 Stick [informal]: criticism. 4 Vaunted: celebrated. 2
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immediate outrage. The truth is, they would never countenance that treatment if it happened in the classroom. Without the shield of sports gear and sweat, the damage to their children becomes clear. I am aware that in the U.S. and Great Britain, coaches are usually volunteers, and volunteers are well- meaning. But I will say very strongly that I don't care. Being well-meaning and full of good will is not sufficient. Abusive coaches are the products of emotionally illiterate and physically and psychologically violent, coercive and under-informed coaching environments. Although many family and educational factors can mold a man like Rice, you can be certain his experience in youth sports has played a major role in honing his understanding of acceptable behavior in sports as an adult. Radically improving coaching's tone and style and respecting an athlete's psychological welfare are so important because bad coaching can unleash monsters on society, each generation meting out abuse learned at the hands of the one before. Men like Rutgers' Rice are not rare; they are simply rarely caught on tape, rarely exposed and rarely challenged. A recent UK study suggests that 75% of young people experience psychologically harmful treatment in sport. This is the gravity of our collective responsibility and the burden of the role of coach. As coaches and educators, we participate in the creation of indelible memories for young people. Coaches cannot afford to be just good at winning. The violence and unpredictability of authoritarian and aggressive coaching infects all those it touches. Think of the number of young men who have experienced Rice's wrath over his career. That kind of poison infects and potentially manifests in all but the most resilient of them. Coaches need to
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