The research also showed that the number of male

Info icon This preview shows pages 4–6. Sign up to view the full content.

The research also showed that the number of male workers taking paternity leave grew to 21700 men per month by 2015. This means currently around 10% of employed fathers take time off from work following childbirth. Data on paid versus unpaid maternity and paternity leave show a slight positive trend over time. This means the economic burden of having a child among those taking leave is falling. Nevertheless, by 2015, less than half (47.5%) of all women received paid maternity leave from their employer. As paid maternity leave is only increasing 0.26 percentage points each year, it will take approximately another decade before half of US women going on leave will get paid time off. This is a very low fi gure for the nation with the world s largest annual gross domestic product. The data show a clear gender gap in paid maternity leave with men (70.7% in 2015) on paternity leave more likely than women to receive pay from their employer. One pos- sibility for this gap is that few men are willing to take unpaid leave to care for a newborn. Disaggregated data show that women on leave are economically better off than the typical mother as they are more likely to be married, White, and more educated. Limitations The CPS data underlying these results are imperfect measures of maternity or paternity TABLE 3 National Regression Results Using Number of People Each Month on Maternity or Paternity Leave as Dependent Variable, United States, 1994 2015 Variable Combined No. on Maternity and PaternityLeave,b(95%CI) No. on Maternity Leave, b (95% CI) No. on Paternity Leave, b (95% CI) No. births (no. babies) 0.24 ( 0.11, 0.58) 0.25 ( 0.07, 0.58) 0.02 ( 0.08, 0.05) Previous month s births (no. babies) 0.45 (0.06, 0.84) 0.42 (0.05, 0.79) 0.03 ( 0.04, 0.10) Time trend (Jan 1994 = 1) 66 ( 236, 103) 133 ( 293, 28) 67 (36, 97) Unemployment rate (% of labor force seeking work) 4418 ( 9 245, 408) 4487 ( 9 064, 90) 69 ( 791, 929) Recession indicator a 15 530 ( 689, 31 749) 13 538 ( 1 842, 28 918) 1992 ( 899, 4 883) Season b Winter (Dec Feb) 2485 ( 12 142, 17 112) 1308 ( 12 563, 15 179) 1 177 ( 1 430, 3 784) Spring (Mar May) 3676 ( 12 446, 19 799) 2814 ( 12 474, 18 103) 862 ( 2 011, 3 736) Summer (Jun Aug) 6274 ( 19 126, 6 578) 6698 ( 18 885, 5 489) 424 ( 1 867, 2 714) State with paid leave law California c 4979 ( 13 258, 23 216) 4 602 ( 12 692, 21 895) 377 ( 2 874, 3 627) New Jersey d 21 903 ( 6 354, 50 160) 22 592 ( 4 203, 49 387) 689 ( 5 725, 4 347) Rhode Island e 13 441 ( 8556, 35 438) 13 355 ( 7 505, 34 214) 86 ( 3 834, 4 007) Intercept 78 952 ( 77 988, 235 893) 79 837 ( 68 985, 228 659) 887 ( 28 861, 27 087) R -square 0.124 0.109 0.435 F -value 3.3 2.8 17.6 Note. CI = con fi dence interval. No. observations = 264. a 1 when National Bureau of Economic Research declares recession; 0 otherwise. b Autumn is the reference season and is therefore excluded. Season units are 1 in the months indicated; 0 otherwise. c Units are 0 until June 2004; 1 after. d Units are 0 until June 2009; 1 after. e Units are 0 until December 2013; 1 after. AJPH RESEARCH March 2017, Vol 107, No. 3 AJPH Zagorsky Peer Reviewed Research 463
Image of page 4

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

leave and likely result in this research slightly underestimating the number of individuals on leave, primarily because the data capture only individuals who spent the entire workweek with their newborn. Individuals who worked partofthe weekbefore startingorstopping their leave are not included in the fi gures. The data also cannot reveal the total length of time
Image of page 5
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Fall '17
  • David Capco
  • Biology, Leave, parental leave, maternity leave, paternity leave

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern