56 billion Grapes 579 billion Almonds 560 billion Strawberries 310 billion

56 billion grapes 579 billion almonds 560 billion

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Dairy Products, Milk — $6.56 billion Grapes — $5.79 billion Almonds — $5.60 billion Strawberries — $3.10 billion Cattle and Calves — $2.53 billion Lettuce — $2.41 billion Walnuts — $1.59 billion Tomatoes — $1.05 billion Pistachios — $1.01 billion Broilers — $939 (million) Source:
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Where does our Food Come From? In 2017, California’s farms and ranches received over $50 billion in cash receipts for their output. This represents an increase of almost 6 percent compared to 2016 1 . California’s agricultural abundance includes more than 400 commodities. Over a third of the country’s vegetables and two-thirds of the country’s fruits and nuts are grown in California. California is the leading US state for cash farm receipts, accounting for over 13 percent of the nation’s total agricultural value.
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Sustainability and Organic Is CA’s production sustainable and organic? What is sustainability? Sustainable farming? Is it needed? Pros vs. Cons Definitions: Sustainability Take from the earth only what it can “sustainably provide.” Environmental health, social justice, and profit for the farmer (make a living not a killing) Sustainable farming is guided by the principle of meeting the needs of the present without compromising the needs of future generations Results in healthier soil, balanced produce, and higher quality and better tasting produce Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” Gro Harlem Brundtland, former Prime Minister of Norway (1987)
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Sustainability and Organic Definitions: Organic or organic farming Legal term defined by the USDA Farmers must employ natural practices that use renewable resources, conserve soil and water Farming that is free of harmful inputs (certain fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides) for 3 years prior to certification Natural fertilization, non-toxic management of weeds, natural fungus and pest control, and buffer zones between organic vineyards and their non-organic neighbors Methods include: Integrated pest, weed and nutrient management Reusable water sources (recycle water) Non-toxic, natural fertilizers (cow, sheep, chicken poop), compost (hoeing!) Non-toxic pest control – birds, chickens
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Sustainability and Organic Certifications: Fish Friendly Farmers
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  • Spring '14
  • BVERGARA
  • Fructose, high-fructose corn syrup

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