88 This study was mentioned in chapter 3 in relation to t prevalence of

88 this study was mentioned in chapter 3 in relation

This preview shows page 63 - 65 out of 132 pages.

in Ochiltree 1994, p.88). This study was mentioned in chapter 3 in relation to the likely high prevalence of emotional disturbance in the controls, which in New Zealand is reported to range from 22.5% in two and a half year olds up to 36% in adolescents.  Published or not, these seem slender foundations on which to develop the child care industry. No doubt there will be other studies, but we may ask, with such references what weight can we attach to Ochiltree’s global assertion that “Research from other countries than the United States found no evidence that non-maternal child care was harmful to children who entered as infants (Andersson 1989, 1990; Hennessy et al, 1990), or in the preschool years (Smith et al 1991).” As seen in chapter 3, a  claim of “no evidence” , as in the last paragraph,  is refuted as soon as any valid evidence is produced . Most of this conclusion too, appears untenable and refuted by the evidence cited in chapters 4, 5 and 7. The conclusions that “qualities of the home environment and the child care environment interact to affect child outcomes”, and “the gender of the child may also be related to outcomes”, is supported by the NICHD Early Child Care Research network (1996) findings. Conclusion 3 The final conclusion begins (p.116): “Non-parental child care is here to stay and is a form of care  suited  to  conditions  in modern  society.”  It  concludes:   “...One  parent  should  have  the opportunity to stay home with infants, not because non-maternal care may be harmful to the child or attachment may be affected, but because it is easier to get to know the new family member, to breast feed - which is so good for the health of the child, and to develop a routine for infant and family before returning to the work force. “Research findings from the United States have dominated, and although child care in that country is generally of low quality compared with Australia, much is made of any minimal negative findings, such as those of Belsky (Belsky and Rovine 1988), and little is made of positive findings. Despite endless research to find negative effects of non-parental care, no evidence has been found that good quality child care harms children, and the evidence from Head Start and some of the early intervention projects suggests that non-parental care can have cognitive and socio-emotional advantages for children from disadvantaged families.  “Children are entitled to child care which will not only enhance their future development but which gives them a sense of well-being. Research needs to move from the seemingly endless quest for negative effects of non-maternal and/or non-parental care to questions that are more relevant to the current situation of families and young children” (p.117).  Comment on conclusion 3 
Image of page 63
This closure of the debate and research was certainly premature. In 1995 Clarke-Stewart, a leading advocate of quality day care, wrote that the effects of non-familial care on infants are “controversial” and “the jury is still out” (1995, pp. 162-3). We have seen that it is an error to describe the United States negative findings as “minimal”. Belsky’s (1992) conclusions are clearly
Image of page 64
Image of page 65

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 132 pages?

  • Summer '17
  • A.Yankowski

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes