And that in the end the south vietnamese were simply

This preview shows page 151 - 153 out of 188 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 1 / Exercise 57
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
Johnson/Mowry
Expert Verified
and that, in the end, the South Vietnamese were simply "stabbed in the front" by a stronger, more determined enemy. McNamara later wrote: "Were such high costs justified? Dean Rusk, Walter Rostov, Lee Kwan Yew, and many other geo-politicians across the globe to this day answer yes. They conclude that without US intervention in Vietnam, communist hegemony--both Soviet and Chinese--would have spread farther through South and East Asia to include control of Indonesia, Thailand, and possibly India. Some would go further and say that the USSR would have been led to take greater risks to extend its influence elsewhere in the world, particularly in the Middle East, where it might well have sought control of the oil-producing nations." CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS The Cuban Missile Crisis was the closest the world ever came to nuclear war. The United States armed forces were at their highest state of readiness ever and Soviet field commanders in Cuba were prepared to use battlefield nuclear weapons to defend the island if it was invaded. Luckily, thanks to the bravery of two men, President John F. Kennedy and Premier Nikita Khrushchev, war was averted. In 1962, the Soviet Union was desperately behind the United States in the arms race. Soviet missiles were only powerful enough to be launched against Europe but U.S. missiles were capable of striking the entire Soviet Union. In late April 1962, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev conceived the idea of placing intermediate-range missiles in Cuba. A deployment in Cuba would double the Soviet strategic arsenal and provide a real deterrent to a potential U.S. attack against the Soviet Union. Meanwhile, Fidel Castro was looking for a way to defend his island nation from an attack by the U.S. Ever since the failed Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961; Castro felt a second attack was inevitable. Consequently, he approved of Khrushchev's plan to place missiles on the island. In the summer of 1962 the Soviet Union worked quickly and secretly to build its missile installations in Cuba. For the United States, the crisis began on October 15, 1962 when reconnaissance revealed Soviet missiles under construction in Cuba. Early the next day, President John Kennedy was informed of the missile installations. Kennedy immediately organized the EX-COMM, a group of his twelve most important advisors to handle the crisis. After seven days of guarded and intense debate within the upper echelons of government, Kennedy concluded to impose a naval quarantine around Cuba. He wished to prevent the arrival of more Soviet offensive weapons on the island. On October 22, Kennedy announced the discovery of the missile installations to the public and his decision to quarantine the island. He also proclaimed that any nuclear missile launched from Cuba would be regarded as an attack on the United
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 1 / Exercise 57
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
Johnson/Mowry
Expert Verified
School of Distance Education Modern World History – IV Semester 152 States by the Soviet Union and demanded that the Soviets remove all of their offensive weapons from Cuba.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture