In addition to team members the following individuals provided recommendations

In addition to team members the following individuals

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In addition to team members, the following individuals provided recommendations for improving the Practice Standard for Work Breakdown Structures— Second Edition: Randall P. Ash, PMP Kenneth P. Katz, PMP Hussain Ali Al-Ansari, Eur Ing, C Eng. Thomas M. Kurihara Mohammed Abdulla Al-Kuwari, PMP, C Eng. Edward Logan, CBM, MSPM Mohammed Safi Batley, MIM Glen Maxfield, PMP Alex S. Brown, PMP Timothy A. MacFadyen, MPM, PMP Lorri Cline, MBA, PMP Kazuhiko Okubo, PMP, PE John E. Cormier, PMP Hans (Ron) Ronhovde, PMP Julia A. Cunningham, PMP Larry Sieck Wanda Curlee, PMP Carol Steuer, PMP Roy C. Greenia, PMP Ed Thomson, PMP C.5 PMI Project Management Standards Program Member Advisory Group The following individuals served as members of the PMI Standards Program Member Advisory Group during development of the Practice Standard for Work Breakdown Structures— Second Edition: Julia M. Bednar, PMP Asbjorn Rolstadas, Ph.D. Carol Holliday, PMP Cyndi Stackpole, PMP Thomas Kurihara Bobbye Underwood, PMP Debbie O’Bray Dave Violette, MPM, PMP ©2006 Project Management Institute, Four Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, PA 19073-3299 USA 49 92312$$CH8 09-22-06 10:36:50
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50 ©2006 Project Management Institute, Four Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, PA 19073-3299 USA 92312$$CH8 09-22-06 10:36:50 C.6 Production Staff Special mention is due to the following employees of PMI: Ruth Anne Guerrero, PMP, Standards Manager Kristin L. Vitello, Standards Project Specialist Nan Wolfslayer, Standards Project Specialist Donn Greenberg, Manager, Publications Dan Goldfischer, Editor-in-Chief Barbara Walsh, CAPM, Publications Planner
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Appendix D Bicycle Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Example D.1 Overview In Chapter 3, Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) ‘‘use-related characteristics’’ were described. These are WBS characteristics that vary from one project to another so that the WBS better satisfies the requirements of a specific project, industry or environment. Consistent with this principle, a WBS can be represented in a variety of ways in order to achieve a specific purpose in a specific situation. A single WBS may also be represented in more than one way in various situations on a given project. This appendix illustrates a number of formats that are found in common practice today. All of these representations, as well as others not included here, may be used to detail the scope of a specific project. To allow the reader to focus on the differences among the various representations, a single WBS will be used to illustrate each format. To help simplify the comparison of these WBS formats, we have chosen the bicycle project example described in the text of the practice standard. D.2 Outline View A very common representation of the WBS is the Outline View in which each level of the WBS is shown by the level of indentation and is accompanied by an alphanumeric outline code, or numbering scheme. Outline views are readily developed using a number of common tools, including word processors and spreadsheets 1 Bicycle 1.1 Frame Set 1.1.1 Frame 1.1.2 Handlebar 1.1.3 Fork 1.1.4 Seat 1.2 Crank Set 1.3 Wheels 1.3.1 Front Wheel 1.3.2 Rear Wheel 1.4
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