Protons neutrons protons neutrons protons neutrons

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protons neutrons protons + neutrons protons × neutrons protons ÷ neutrons protons + electrons 268 %
Hint 1. How to determine the number of protons In the periodic table , you will find an integer, called the atomic number, written above the symbol for each element. The atomic number, which is unique to each element, indicates the number of protons in an atom of that element. Hint 4. Determine the location of the particles in an atom Where are each of the particles located in an atom? Drag each item to the appropriate bin.
Correct The diagram of an atom given here is not drawn to scale. The nucleus of the atom is very small compared to the overall size of the atom. If an atom were the size of a football stadium, the nucleus would be about the size of a marble. Animation—Rutherford’s Experiment: Nuclear Atoms Watch the animation and study Rutherford’s nuclear atom model. In 1909, Ernest Rutherford performed an experiment to explore the atomic structure. In his experiment, he projected high-speed particles onto a thin gold foil. He found that all particles did not follow the same path. Many particles passed through the foil without any scattering, implying that most of the space in an α α
atom is empty. Some particles were scattered at a large angle, and very few of them scattered back in the direction from which they had come. Based on these observations, Rutherford proposed an atomic model, which is known as Rutherford’s atomic model. Part A - Conclusions from Rutherford’s experiment Watch the animation depicting Rutherford’s experiment and choose which of the following conclusions are correct. Check all that apply. Hint 1. Rutherford’s experiment In Rutherford’s experiment, he bombarded positively charged particle from a radioactive source onto thin gold foil. The foil was surrounded by a sheet of fluorescent material (zinc sulfide ). The sheet lit up when it was hit with particles. The image below shows the scattering of particles. The circular green spots on the fluorescent screen are formed when the particles hit the screen. By looking at the number of particles that scattered at different angles from the gold foil, Rutherford proposed an atomic model, which is known as Rutherford’s atomic model. The image given below explains the molecular view of the scattering of particles from the gold foil.

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