0 Where are Kaposis sarcoma lesions found Everywhereinside and out They

0 where are kaposis sarcoma lesions found

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 19 pages.

0 Where are Kaposi's sarcoma lesions found? Everywhere—inside and out. They typically occur on the face, neck, arms, back, thighs, and in the lungs, lymphatic system, and GI system. 0 How many years does a patient usually live after being diagnosed with HIV? 8 to 10 years. Most patients eventually die from PCP. 0 A patient with AIDS presents with a grayish-white plaque on the lateral borders of her tongue that does not scrape off. What is the diagnosis? Hairy leukoplakia. 0 What parts of the pulmonary system are affected by asbestosis? The pleura and peritoneum. Asbestosis increases the risk ofmesothelioma. It also causes pneumoconioses that invade the lungs. 0 What is the most common cause of hypercalcemia? Hyperparathyroidism. This condition accounts for 60% of ambulatory hypercalcemics. 0 What are the most common causes of non-gonococcal urethritis? Chlamydia trachomatis. Ureaplasma urealyticum is another common cause. 0 What is the most common clinical manifestation of disseminated gonococcal infection? Gonococcal arthritis-dermatitis syndrome. Arthritis, a pustular or papular rash, and tenosynovitis are exhibited with this syndrome. 0 What is the most common cause of epididymitis?
Image of page 2
Chlamydia trachomatis, in men under 35 years old. E. Coli, in prepubertal and older patients. 0 A patient with polyuria, a low urine osmolality, and a high serum osmolality is given vasopressin, but no change in osmolality is noted. Which type of diabetic insipidus does she have? Nephrogenic. Vassopressin will not help because the distal renal tubules are refractory to antidiuretic hormone. In central DI, the pathology involves a problem with the production ofADH in the posterior pituitary. An increase in urine osmolality of at least 50% will occur with vasopressin administration if the problem is central DI. 0 What organisms are usually implicated in the development of diverticulitis? E. coli and B. fragilis. 0 What is Hampton's hump? A chest x-ray f i nding associated with pulmonary embolisms. It is an infiltrate with a "hump" pointed toward the hilus and a clearing with a vascular distribution. 0 What is the most common cause of portal hypertension in adults? Cirrhosis of the liver. 0 The portal vein receives blood from what two tributaries? The splenic vein and the superior mesenteric vein. 0 Herpangina is caused by what virus? Coxsackie group A virus. A sore throat, fever, malaise, and vesicular lesions on the posterior pharynx or the soft palate are prevalent with this disease. 0 A patient presents with arms extended and fingers spread apart. Her extremities are flexing and extending in a static-kinetic tremor. This tremor can be associated with what disease? Hyperthyroidism. 0 What is the acid base disorder in the following situation? pH = 7.29, pC02 = 30, HCO 3 - = 15, Na = 131, and Cl = 94 This is a primary metabolic acidosis with an elevated ion gap.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 19 pages?

  • Spring '14
  • Ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, Bowel obstruction

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture