Out of context can sometimes be ambiguousbe sure that

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Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 44
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
Johnson/Mowry
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sents. out of context can sometimes be ambiguous–be sure that your students understand atleast the general significance of each. sent. they read and translate.)15. Est modus in rebus; sunt certi fines ultra quos virtus inveniri non potest.There is a limit in things; there are certiain boundaries beyond which virtue cannot be found. (Moderation, theso-called “Golden Mean,” was a prime tenet of Stoic philosophy.)16. Hoc, Fortuna, tibi videtur aequum?Does this, Fortune, seem fair to you? (Fortune, like our “Lady Luck,” was often personified in Romanliterature, and the goddess Fortuna was quite important in Roman religion.)A VISIT FROM THE YOUNG INTERNSLanguebam: sed tu comitatus protinus ad mevenisti centum, Symmache, discipulis.Centum me tetigere manus aquilone gelatae:non habui febrem, Symmache, nunc habeo!I was sick: but you, Symmachus, came to me immediately,accompanied by one hundred students.One hundred hands chilled by the North wind touched me:I did not have a fever, Symmachus, now I have (now I do)!(Anyone who has ever visited the health center of a university that has a medical school can fullysympathize with this complaint! Students are likely to have trouble with the disjointed word order: helpthem to see the linkage in both comitatus . . . centum . . . discipulisand centum . . . manus
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Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 44
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
Johnson/Mowry
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4 TEACHER’S GUIDE and ANSW ER KEY for WHEELOCK’S LATIN: Chapter 22 aquilone gelataeand to appreciate the parallelism in the centum/centum phrases, and esp. thesuspenseful effect created by delaying the key words discipulisand gelatae.Begin your discussion ofthe poem by asking someone to explain what’s basically going on, what the joke is–Martial’s epigramsnearly always have one, and this one climaxes in the nicely balanced non habui/nunc habeoparadox–then after translating and discussing stylistics, etc., conclude by reading the little poem aloudin your liveliest manner, or ask a student to do so. The fact that the doctor’s name is Greek adds a bitof an ethnic slur to the piece, not uncommon in Roman satiric writing. Go over the comprehensionquestions on this passage in LectionesB of the Workbook.ON AMBITION AND LITERATURE, BOTH LATIN AND GREEKPoetae per litteras hominibus magnam perpetuamque famam dare possunt; multi viri, igitur,litteras de suis rebus scribi cupiunt. Trahimur omnes studio laudis et multi gloria ducuntur,quae aut in litteris Graecis aut Latinis inveniri potest. Qui, autem, videt multum fructum gloriaein versibus Latinis sed non in Graecis, nimium errat, quod litterae Graecae leguntur in omnibusfere gentibus, sed Latinae in finibus suis continentur.Poets can give men great and enduring fame through their literature; many men, therefore, want literature to (desire thatliterature) be written about their accomplishments; we are all drawn (motivated) by the pursuit of (eagerness for) praise,and many men are led (driven) by (the desire for) glory (fame), which can be found in either Greek or Latin literature.However, he (the man) who sees considerable benefit (advantage) for his glory (reputation) in Latin verse[s] (poetry), but
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