Watching the advertising is noticeable that Mr Goldwaters name is not mentioned

Watching the advertising is noticeable that mr

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Watching the advertising is noticeable that Mr. Goldwater’s name is not mentioned or displayed at all, but for the people were living in 1964, it would have heard his idea to use nuclear weapons to defoliate Vietnam, considered his assertion that “extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice,” and remembered the sense of impending doom during the Cuban missile crisis just two years prior. The suggestion is as subtle as the image of a nuclear explosion can be. Furthermore, playing again on the public perception that Goldwater’s tough right-wing views meant he’d more willingly use nuclear weapons, LBJ and the Democrats ran an ad showing yet another young girl, this time innocently licking an ice cream cone. A voice-over says that children need vitamins, not
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Cortes 4 radioactive fallout. The voice then contends that Barry Goldwater wants to continue and even increase the number of nuclear bomb tests. Just like “Daisy Girl,” this advertising achieved its goal of painting Goldwater as a mad dog, which greatly contributed to his loss to Johnson in the elections. 1968 Nixon versus Humphrey versus Wallace: The 1968 election was a chaotic political contest between the Republican Richard Nixon, sitting Vice President by the Democrat Hubert Humphrey, and third independent party candidate George Wallace. From the moment President Lyndon Baines Johnson announced he would not pursue another term (March 31, 1968) through election night November 5, 1968, the candidates, specifically Democrat Hubert Humphrey, faced a challenging battle for the top spot in the White House. In the throes of the Vietnam War, which had gotten bloodier on the watch of Lyndon Johnson, and the ongoing Civil Rights struggles (Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in April of this election year), a serious state of political and social chaos and violence became a daily reality in the United States. This was the political context that candidates faced in the election of 1968. One of the TV advertising throughout the presidential election season was “Laughter” by the Democrat Hubert Humphrey. Laughter is heard as these words appear on the screen: “Agnew for vice president?” The laughter becomes hysterical. Next, the screen reads: “This would be funny if it weren’t so serious.” The goal was to reinforce unknown vice presidential opponent Spiro Agnew’s image as a political joke. But Agnew had the last laugh: Humphrey’s party lost the election. On the other hand, the Republican Richard Nixon was playing his presidential campaign advertising "Vietnam." He was making a comeback of sorts that year as he had lost in a previous bid in 1960 for President and in 1962 for Governor of California.
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