1 case ii consider another case of mutation selection

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CASE II : Consider another case of mutation-selection balance and the spread of beneficial recessive alleles. Set the following parameters: Initial Frequency of allele A 1 1.0, Fitness A 1 A 1 =0.5, A 1 A 2 =0.5, A 2 A 2 =1.0, Mutation Rate A 1 =>A 2 = 0.0001, A 2 =>A 1 = 0, Number of Generations=1000, Pop. Size=1000, # of Populations=5, and no migration. (26) How do the fitness values show that allele A 2 is a beneficial recessive? =
(27) Will allele A 1 get more or less common through time?
(28) On the figure below, graph your prediction of the frequency of allele A through time. Consider the shape of the curve as you do so (e.g., Is the spread or loss of the Page 7 of 14
allele constant? Does the rate of spread or loss of the allele slow down or speed up over time? Make sure all parameter values are set as described above . Click “Go”. (29) On the figure above, sketch the results of the simulation. Do your predictions match the results? Fr eq A1 1 0 Time (generation s)
(30) Why does it take allele a so long to make it into the population even though it is an extremely beneficial allele?
(31) What is the effect of “partial dominance” compared to ‘complete recessiveness” on the evolutionary dynamics when a beneficial recessive allele is considered? (how is this simulation different from the previous one)
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The degree to which an allele is dominant or recessive in a population (from completely dominant to completely recessive and everything in between) affects evolutionary dynamics.

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