It was built around 2600 BCE It was abandoned around 1700 BCE Two views of the

It was built around 2600 bce it was abandoned around

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It was built around 2600 BCE. It was abandoned around 1700 BCE. Two views of the great bath of Mohenjo-daro
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The Great Bath The "great bath" is the earliest public water tank. The tank measures approximately 12 meters north-south and 7 meters wide, with a maximum depth of 2.4 meters. Two staircases lead down into the tank from the north and south and small sockets at the edges of the stairs are thought to have held wooden planks or treads. At the foot of the stairs is a small ledge with a brick edging that extends the entire width of the pool.
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Great Bath
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Streets At Mohenjo-Daro narrow streets and alleyways are off of the major streets, leading into more private neighborhoods. Many of the brick houses were two stories high, with thick walls and high ceilings to keep the rooms cool in the hot summer months.
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Wells Private wells were rebuilt over many generations for large households and neighborhoods. This well in DK G area at Mohenjo-daro stands like a chimney because all of the surrounding earth has been removed by excavation.
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pottery, Mohenjo-Daro
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48 Mohenjo-daro shows remarkable city planning. Its streets are laid on a grid. Buildings were made of mud bricks. The city had up to 35,000 residents. It had an advanced drainage system. Some buildings were two stories tall. It had a large well, a granary, and a central marketplace. Computer-aided drawing of Mohenjo-daro
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49 Harappa was located next to modern-day Sahiwal in Punjab, northeast Pakistan. The Harappans thrived from about 3300 to 1600 BCE. Harappa may have had up to 40,000 residents. Harappa city gate Sukkar Sahiwal
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50 Most Harappans lived in one-room dormitories. Wealthy Harappans lived in two to three-story homes with up to 12 rooms.
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Granary The "granary" of Harappa is found on Mound F. It is a brick structure that was built on a massive brick foundation over 45 meters north-south and 45 meters east-west. Two rows of six rooms that appear to be foundations are arranged along a central passageway that is about 7 meters wide and partly paved with baked bricks. Each room measures 15.2 by 6.1 meters and has three sleeper walls with air space between them.
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Well A large public well and public bathing platforms were found in the southern part of Mound AB at Harappa. These public bathing areas may also have been used for washing clothes as is common in many traditional cities in Pakistan and India today.
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Mound E Gateway Artists Conception
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Language The Indus (or Harappan) people used a pictographic script. Some 3500 specimens of this script survive in stamp seals carved in stone, in molded terracotta and faience amulets, in fragments of pottery, and in a few other categories of inscribed objects. In addition to the pictographic signs, the seals and amulets often contain iconographic motifs, mostly realistic pictures of animals apparently worshipped as sacred, and a few cultic scenes, including anthropomorphic deities and worshippers.
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