Restorative programs take more time than the

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Restorative programs take more time than the traditional disci- plinary actions of suspension and expulsion. While the initial time investment may be substantial, restorative practices can ultimately save time by preventing or diffusing problems early. Restorative practices also may require a certain amount of fund- ing, depending on the practices and programming. Restorative justice can be cost-free when solely incorporated into class time. But funding By allowing students to take leadership roles in every level of the process, including development, planning, and implementation of the program, peer juries place youth in a central role to address student misconduct.
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ICJIA • Implementing restorative justice: A guide for schools • 17 may be necessary for school-wide training, teacher overtime, recognitions such as annual awards, and marketing materials. Suggestions for implementing restorative justice Financial support for implementing restorative justice programs may be available through Title IV Safe and Drug Free Schools, U.S. Department of Education, school discretionary funds, fundraising, and partnerships with local social service agencies. Records on restorative practices should be kept to measure progress and success. Schools should maintain data on referrals made, cases heard, agreements developed, and participants’ academic performance, and, as a point of comparison, information on disciplinary actions, such as suspen- sions, expulsions, and truancy. Tangible data and records are important to secure support and funding. Figure 3 Comparison of school restorative justice practices and programs Restorative discussions Circles Peer jury Mediation & conferencing - Peer mentors - Teachers and other school staff - Members of the school community - Minor student worries - Minor disruptions - Need to debrief and discuss issues - Challenging situations - Worried parents - Disruptions - Interpersonal conflicts Restorative justice practices Restorative justice programs Involves: Responds to: Involves: Responds to: - Class groups - School council - Whole staff - Class issues/harm within class - Problems affecting students - Staff issues - Peer jurors - Teachers and other school staff - Restorative justice coordinator - Student conflicts - Staff conflicts - Staff-student conflicts - Class issues/harm within class - Peer mediators - Teachers and other school staff - Trained facilitators - Family members - Student conflicts - Staff conflicts - Staff-student conflicts - Staff-parent conflicts - Concerns about a student or behavior - Minor issues involving harm caused in a group of students - Minor issues involving harm/ disruption in a group of students - Issues needing parental involvement - Exclusion issues Adapted from Transforming Conflict at .transformingconflict.org/R estorativ e A ppr oaches and P ractices.htm.
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18 • Implementing restorative justice: A guide for schools • ICJIA Real change is made through systemic adoption of restorative justice. A whole school approach is the best way to provide restorative justice, with the entire school community using restorative practices in its daily work.
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  • Spring '17
  • ........., Restorative Practices

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