to make these exerts one large novel the food industry aggressively pursued any

To make these exerts one large novel the food

This preview shows page 5 - 7 out of 7 pages.

to make these exerts one large novel, the food industry aggressively pursued any option that would not let such a thing happen. When the novel was nothing more than articles in a socialist newspaper it wasn’t much of a threat, considering most Americans were not socialist. Their fear alone was proof enough for the need to make a serious change in the meat industry.In the summer time around Chicago's stockyards a century ago, the odor and clamor were almost intolerable. Thousands of cows were teeming into filthy pens and inside the slaughterhouses; floors were splattered with blood and crawling with rodents. Upton Sinclair went to the stockyards in order to illustrate, and find out for himself what it was like, the workers' conditions. When he got there he did not hold his tongue, he wrote about them to their full extent without any fear. He showed workers falling into machinery and being mixed up with the animal meat. The workers didn’t even try to dig out the remains or stop production. If they saw anything in the meat, such as a rat, they would just ignore it and keep on working, they had
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to. In this time period a job was everything and if you didn’t do your job up to the producers’ standards then you lost your job. After reading this book, readers were outraged and they demanded reform. People sent letters everyday to President Roosevelt called for change in the meat industry. Even President Roosevelt seemed to be just as shocked by the details of how cattle and hogs were being sliced into beef and pork -- and by how much condemned meat was ending up on American dinner tables. Some Congressmen didn’t believe all that was in The Jungleand wanted proof according to Lawrence Reed: “Congressman E.D. Crumpacker of Indiana noted in testimony before the House Agriculture Committee in June 1906 that not even one of those officials ‘ever registered any complaint or [gave] any public information with respect to the manner of the slaughtering or preparation of meat or food products…’ To Crumpacker and other contemporary skeptics, "either the government officials in Chicago [were] woefully derelict in their duty, or the situation over there [had been] outrageously overstated to the country." If the packing plants were as bad as alleged in The Jungle, surely the government inspectors who never said so must be judged as guilty of neglect as the packers were of abuse” (Reed). Despite this, Roosevelt threw his influence behind legislation to control the meat industry. A few months after The Junglewas published, Congress passed the Meat Inspection Act, which set up sanitary standards and the Pure Food and Drug Act, which required accurate labeling of food and allowed federal inspectors to prosecute plant owners. The Act’s weren’t supported by everyone because they saw it as just another way for the meatpackers to benefit, “To his credit, Upton Sinclair actually opposed the law because he saw it for what it really was--a boon for the big meatpackers. Sinclair ended up being used by the very industry he hated” (Reed). In the end Americans got what they wanted – change in the meat industry.
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