Escott Paul Slave to Soldier Fighting for Freedom HistoryNet HistoryNet nd Web

Escott paul slave to soldier fighting for freedom

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Escott, Paul. " Slave to Soldier: Fighting for Freedom." HistoryNet . HistoryNet, n.d. Web. Paul D. Escott is the Reynolds Professor of History at Wake Forest University and he specializes in the history of the Civil War. In fact, he has published nine books exploring causes, effects, and the aftermath of the civil war along later additional volumes. In this article specifically, Paul Escott explores how African Americans were utilized during the civil war both for the Union and Confederacy. Since the Union possessed greater numbers of soldiers the Confederacy was faced with a challenge. General Cleburne of the Confederacy was known to have said that slavery, being one of the chief sources of strength for starting the war, had now become one of their chief sources of weakness, from a military point of view. This was because the North was utilizing the African Americans to fight in battle while the south, who had so many slaves, wouldn’t trust them with combat arms. This information will be important to understand the treatment of African Americans during the war itself and how they were utilized by both sides. Fine, Zachary. "Not All Racist Monuments Should Be Torn Down." New Republic . New Republic Magazine, 10 Mar. 2016. Web. Zachary Fine is a writer originally from New Orleans, currently living in France. He writes various articles about many topics from angles that are more out of the ordinary. In this article Zachary writes about the importance of monuments in general and shows the argument for and against civil war monuments. He answers questions about what the purpose of monuments should be, whether they should reflect modern values, should they remind us of the past even if it is painful? Does erasing historical reminders in the name
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Dean 18 of more modern values really going to help us in the present? However, by preserving them, do we also legitimize the legacy of white supremacy? This article will be key in looking at the issue of civil war monuments not just as a good or bad argument; instead it will serve as a thought provoking article allowing me to contemplate which angles effect people. Joshua D., Wright and Esses Victoria M. "Support for the Confederate Battle Flag in the Southern United States: Racism or Southern Pride?" Journal of Social and Political Psychology, Vol 5, Iss 1, Pp 224-243 (2017), no. 1, 2017, p. 224. EBSCOhost, doi:10.5964/jspp.v5i1.687. Joshua Wright is a Professor of Social Psychology and Migration and Ethnic Relations at the University of Western Ontario. Victoria Esses is also a Professor of Psychology at the University of Western Ontario. This article explores both sides of the racism debate, not really about civil war statues, instead the article explores Confederate Battle Flag that is still flown outside of many homes across the U.S. Supporters of the flag argue that their support of the flag is not driven by race, but by pride of the South. The Opponents of the flag argue that it does indeed represent racism and that the mere support of such a symbol
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