Marx believed that the dominant feature of all societies was the mode of

Marx believed that the dominant feature of all

This preview shows page 6 - 9 out of 17 pages.

Marx believed that the dominant feature of all societies was the mode of production (the way people develop and produce material goods)- This emphasis upon the economic  arena led Marx to focus much of his attention on the relationship between the producers (workers) and those who owned the means of production. Alienation of the proletariat from the products of their labor is indicative of an unequal  distribution of property and power in society. This unequal access to property and power lays the foundation for an inevitable class conflict that Marx believed to prevail   throughout all of history. In every society, according to Marx, there exist two opposing groups: one wishing to  preserve the status quo and the other attempting to modify existing relationships.  The relationship between the elite and the state are views in two alternative ways by  contemporary Marxist criminologists: Instrumental Marxism and Structural Marxism.  Instrumental Marxism  sees the state and criminal law as intricately linked to the  bourgeoisie- the economic elite use the power of the state as an instrument for the  maintenance of their own power.  Structural Marxism  sees the state as semi- autonomous from the power elite- while the state typically supports the power elite  (therefore protecting the capitalist system), it does not always do so. Group Conflict Perspective:  George Vold-Group Conflict Theory Vold viewed humans as group oriented and society as a collection of groups, each with  its own interests. These groups form because members have common interests and  needs that can be best met through collective action. Vold maintained that groups come into conflict with one another as the interests and  purposes they serve begin to overlap and encroach. When this occurs, each group  tends to defend itself. Vold stated that “conflict between groups tends to develop and  intensify the loyalty of the group members to their respective groups.”
Image of page 6
Chapter 9 Notes: Critical Criminology  03:30 Another element of Vold’s conflict theory pertains to the distribution of power- Who, for  example, enacts laws and who enforces them? An interesting aspect of Vold’s theory is that he viewed crime and delinquency as  minority group behavior. This represents an extension of his belief that human behavior  is dominated by group behavior characterized by conflict.  Vold cautioned that while his theory pertained to crime in general, it was most  appropriate for explaining four kinds of crime: Crimes arising from political protest
Image of page 7
Chapter 9 Notes: Critical Criminology  03:30
Image of page 8
Image of page 9

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 17 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture