Just as I discovered in own writing skills Cades writing has definite strengths

Just as i discovered in own writing skills cades

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Just as I discovered in own writing skills, Cade’s writing has definite strengths and weaknesses. By focusing more on developing his ideas and organization through the pre-writing stage, and implementation of more technology in my writing curriculum, I know his weaker areas will improve. His positive attitude and his self-perception as a good writer show me that he will be willing to work hard to progress even further in his writing abilities. Defining Comprehension Strategies and Instructional Strategies Teachers and students both utilize strategies to help improve reading comprehension. The difference between comprehension strategies used by students and instructional strategies used by educators is often unclear. Teachers create instructional moments to help students improve in their reading comprehension. These teacher-controlled elements are aligned with instructional strategies. “Therefore, instructional activities in comprehension are the means by which teachers support students’ awareness and learning in the area of reading comprehension” (Hollenbeck & Saternus, 2013, pg. 562). On the other hand, student-controlled comprehension strategies are the personal practices strategically applied by students to guide their thinking about the text as they read. As reiterated by Hollenbeck & Saternus (2013), “a text management strategy can be defined as a purposeful act employed within the physical text to support comprehension” (pg.
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15 GETTING TO KNOW THE LITERACY LEARNER 562). When the applied strategies match the learning style and needs of the reader, growth in comprehension development can be achieved. Over a period of two days, Cade was presented with both a literary and informative text that were each followed by critical thinking questions. My purpose for this was to see if his applied comprehension strategies were different depending on the type of text he was reading. However, no matter the genre or text structure, Cade stuck with strategies that are universal. Before reading each passage, he took a moment to preview the questions. This helped set a purpose for reading and kept him focused as he read. While reading, Cade applied close reading practices that we use in class quite frequently. “Complex texts do not give up their information easily; consequently they often require close reading in order to understand the author’s intended ideas and the organization of those ideas” (Reutzel & Cooter, 2016, pg. 389). As Case read each text, I noticed him underlining key ideas that corresponded to the questions he had previewed. He also circled unfamiliar vocabulary and reread the sentences in which they were contained to develop a contextual understanding of each word, which he then wrote in the margins. Along with vocabulary, Cade made other margin notations of questions he had regarding the text, story elements for the literary text, and the use of text structure in the informative text. Cade’s chosen comprehension strategies of previewing the questions, monitoring unfamiliar vocabulary, and close reading habits help him develop a coherent understanding of the given text. “Coherence is
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  • Fall '18
  • Writing, CADE, Literacy Learner

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