While the fourth amendment hints at privacy and is

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  • CJUS 400
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  • mkewall18
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While the Fourth Amendment hints at privacy and is explicit on searches and seizures,which other amendment applies these rights?
CJUS 400*Fourteenth AmendmentThe use of criminal laws directed at conduct or persons believed to be related to criminalacts is common, but they must be tailored to avoid what?
How are privacy rights and protections against unreasonable searches and seizuresrelated?
Chapter 10: HomicideVocab:Homicide: The killing of one human being by another. There are three types of homicide: justifiable, excusable, and felonious. P. 268“born alive” requirement: To be able to charge homicide of a newborn baby, the prosecution must be able to prove that the child was living at the time it was killed. P. 273Feticide: Murder of an unborn child. P. 273Murder: Unlawful homicide with malice aforethought. P. 279transferred intent: A doctrine used when the intention to harm one individual inadvertently causes a second person to be hurt instead. The individual causing the harm will be seen as having “intended” the act by means of the “transferred intent” doctrine. P. 281Premeditation: Mental determination to unlawfully kill another person after planning orreflection on actions causing death. P. 281felony murder: Most states and the federal government have felony murder statutes that punish as murder the causing of death of another while the defendant is committinga felony of violence. A felony murder conviction does not require a showing of malice or deliberate intent to kill. P. 283Manslaughter: Criminal homicides other than murder. Most states provide for two degrees of manslaughter: voluntary and involuntary. P. 286perfect self-defense: A homicide in which the killer subjectively believes that his or her conduct was necessary and reasonable and that, by objective standards, a reasonable person would believe it was lawful and complied with the requirements of the
CJUS 400law. The homicide is either justifiable or excusable, and it carries no criminal liability. P. 291imperfect self-defense: A homicide in which the killer subjectively, but unreasonably, believes that his or her conduct was necessary. It may be unlawful if the killing was done with excessive or unnecessary force. An unnecessary killing in self-defense, in defense ofanother, or to prevent or terminate a felony of violence could be imperfect self-defense. P. 291Euthanasia: A killing of a terminally sick or injured individual with only a short time to live. Also called mercy killing. P. 293assisting suicide: The act of furnishing the means of a suicide, pursuant to a statute that permits such assistance. P. 293Homicide in General P. 268The Corpus Delicti RequirementProving Corpus Delicti in “No Body” CasesBody Without Proof of the Cause of Death Cases P. 271The Common Law “Born Alive” Requirement and the Crime of Feticide (Fetal Murder)Proof That the Victim was Alive at the Time of the Defendant’s Unlawful Act P. 273 When is a Person Legally Dead?

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