rising-to-the-challenge-mental-health-addiction-service-development-plan-v2.doc

About what has been helpful and what has not in order

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about what has been helpful and what has not, in order to shape their own practice. 20 Rising to the Challenge: The Mental Health and Addiction Service Development Plan 2012–2017
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2 Building infrastructure for integration between primary and specialist services Expected result Enhanced coordination and integration between primary and specialist services through developing infrastructure. 2.1 Rationale Specialist mental health and addiction services have grown significantly over recent years. In 18 out of the 20 DHBs, access to these services has reached the 3 percent of the population originally targeted in the Blueprint for Mental Health Services in New Zealand: How things need to be (Mental Health Commission 1998). Additional funding has since been dedicated to various primary mental health initiatives around New Zealand. Despite these investments, current access to all of the services across the continuum for mental health and addiction is unknown; in many areas services continue to operate in a fragmented manner; and primary care providers point to a significant shortfall in responses to high-prevalence mental health and addiction issues. Greater coordination and integration are required through a shared systems response. This would involve primary and specialist services collectively agreeing on how they will work together and support one another to provide seamless, effective services for people experiencing mental health and addiction issues. The Government’s focus on enhancing health system integration, including the development of integrated family health centres, provides an opportunity to increase national consistency and better integrate responses to mental health and addiction issues across the primary– specialist continuum. To capitalise on this opportunity, policy makers, funders and service providers first need to address infrastructural barriers to enhancing coordination and integration between primary and specialist services. Rising to the Challenge: 21 The Mental Health and Addiction Service Development Plan 2012–2017
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The actions in this section aim to prepare for improved coordination and integration between primary and specialist services by addressing some of the practical barriers to integrating services. These barriers include a lack of office space available, differences in eligible populations, separate information technology (IT) systems, variable workforce capability and a lack of monitoring of mental health and addiction responses within primary care settings. 2.2 Measuring progress The Ministry of Health will work with key stakeholders to develop an agreed set of outcome measures and KPIs. Once agreed, these indicators will be used to measure progress in implementing this Plan. Until then, the Ministry of Health will measure progress through: Primary care and DHB accountability measures Monitoring access and contacts for mental health and addiction issues within primary care (Ministry of Health–funded primary mental health initiatives and general primary care).
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  • Summer '14
  • JohnWeekes
  • Health disparities, Population health, The Mental Health and Addiction

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