Consider issues such as understanding substance use

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consider issues such as understanding substance use and offending, developing mechanisms to cope with cravings and withdrawal, developing alternative behaviors, managing emotions, enhancing problem-solving and communication, and developing relapse prevention plans)” (Casey and Day, 2014, p. 362). Programs such as these will aid offenders in putting their drug habits behind them and ensure they do not revert to drugs. In addition to this, when incarcerated, drug offenders are to be separated from the rest of the population within a therapy community. Casey and Day (2014) state, “prison-based therapeutic communities, the most intensive form of program, in which participants are separated from the prison culture and immersed in a dedicatedtherapeutic environment” (Casey and Day, 2014, p. 362). This allows the offenders to focus on getting the help they need and to become rehabilitated so they can be released back into society. While participating in these programs, drug offenders should drug tested once a month to ensure their sobriety. Once admitted to a therapeutic community, upon meeting all expectations, inmateswill complete their time within this specific population until it is time for them to be released. Upon release under parole or probation, ex-drug offenders are to be required to continue their monthly drug tests in addition to attending a form of group such as narcotics anonyms. The individual must bring a signed attendance sheet to their parole or probation officer each week as a part of their conditional release. Requiring drug tests and group attendance will keep the
THE IMPORTANCE OF DISTINCT REHABILITATION PROGRAMS9offenders accountable and will motivate them to remain drug-free. In the end, drug treatment andrehabilitation should be of high property to correctional administrators. These specific programs should be offered and utilized to benefit the inmates as well as society and will reduce recidivism. Mentally Ill OffendersAnother major offender population that fills jails and prisons are those that are mentally ill. Mental illness is on the rise in the United States and the actions of the individuals are getting them incarcerated. Jennifer Skeem, Sarah Manchak, and Jillian Peterson (2011) indicate, “Individuals with serious and often disabling mental illnesses like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression are grossly overrepresented in the criminal justice system” (Skeem, Manchak, and Peterson, 2011, p. 110). This can be a challenge for correctional administrators as they are having to combat higher incarceration rates, especially in the mentally ill population of their facility. Simply putting a mentally ill individual in a standard rehabilitationprogram such as group therapy and just letting them serve their time will not correct the mental illness problem. This will not reduce recidivism and will just feed the cycle of getting rearrested.

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