Press 1965 pp 159 62 66 1n specters of marx derrida

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Press, 1965), pp. 159-62.(66.) 1n Specters of Marx, Derrida observes. "My feeling, then, is that Marx scares himself ... [as] he himself pursues ... relentlessly someone who almost resembles him tothe point that we could mistake [the] one for the other: a brother, a double, thus a diabolical image. A kind of ghost of himself. Whom he would like to distance, distinguish:
to oppose. He has recognized someone who, like him, appears obsessed by ghosts" (p.139).(67.) 1n pursuing "Blandois," Clermam is engaged in an act of conjuration and exorcism: "Come so that I may chase you! You hear! I chase you. I pursue you. I run after you to chase you away from here. I will not leave you alone. And the ghost does not leave its prey, namely, its hunter. It has understood Instantly that one is hunting it just to hunt it, chasing it away only so as to chase after it" (Denida, p. 140). Also, see Dianne F. Sadoff, Monsters of Affecdon: Dickens, Eliot, and Bronte on Fatherhood (Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1982) pp. 14 and 18-9; and Elaine Showalter, "Guilt, Authority, and the Shadows of Little Dorrit," NCF 34. 1 (June 1979): 20-40.(68.) Freud, "Family Romances," 9:239n1. Freud does not cite his source for the quotation.(69.) For a humanistic reading of Little Dorrit, see Charlotte Rotkin, "Deception: In Society, Characterization, and Narrative Strategy," in Deception in Dickens' "Little Dorrit." American University Studies, English Language and Literature, 80 (New York, Bern, and Paris: Peter Lang, 1989), pp. 47-72. Also, see Anny Sadrin, "Parentage and Inheritance," in Parentage and Inheritance in the Novels of Charles Dickens, European Studies in English Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1994). pp. 6-17: and "Nobody's Fault' or the Inheritance of Guilt," pp. 74-94. In Common Scents: Comparative Encounters in High-Victorian Fiction, Carlisle does not deal specifically with Little Dorrit, concentrating instead on "the male melancholic" in Our Mutual Friend (1864-65) in the characters of John Harmon and Eugene Wrayburn: she writes of Harmon who, "having repudiated the father tainted by trade. is given birth by his wife ... a consummation ... devoutly to be wished ... (even as the novel] suggests the extent to which manhood may depend on forms of support beyond those offered by a woman" ([Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2004], p. 114).(70.) See John Holloway, "The Denouement of Little Dorrit," in Little Dorrit, by Charles Dickens (Middlesex, UK: Baltimore: and Victoria, Australia: Penguin Books, 1967), pp. 896-7. for a suggestive summary of the circumstances surrounding the codicil to Gilbert Clennam's will.(71.) My interpretation has been informed by D. W. Winnicott. "Mirror-Role of Mother and Family in Child Development," in Playing and Reality (New York: Basic Books, 1971), pp. 111-8. Winnicott argues. "In individual emotional development the precursor of the mirror is the mother's face" (p. 111). He later continues, "What does the baby see when he or she looks at the mother's face? I am suggesting that, ordinarily, what the baby sees is himself or herself ... Many babies, however, do have to have a long experience of not getting back what they are giving. They look and they do not see themselves" (p. 112). Winnicott himself refers to Lacan's "Le Stade du Miroir" (p. 117).

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