Little action was taken the proceeding s article

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Chapter 11 / Exercise 11.6
Chemistry for Engineering Students
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Little action was taken. The Proceeding ’s article pointed out that in 1923 Chicago spent $15 million for the water department, $75 million for the sanitary and health department, and $25,000 for smoke prevention. It estimated that correct operation of heating equipment could eliminate 80 percent of soot and smoke emissions. Society could not estimate the dollar cost of soot and smoke on health, it said, nor calculate the cost of being sick or half sick, all of which should stimulate action to abate smoke. The only things that were done was for water and sanitary and for smoke preventions. Frederick Cottrell (1877-1948) the first industrial environmentalist Cottrell in California in 1907 invented the Cottrell electrostatic precipitator for the removal of arsenic, lead, sulfur dioxide, and other pollutants from the atmosphere. It was the first practical anti-pollution device. He patented his direct current high voltage (30,000 volts) invention in 1908. Global warming 79
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Chapter 11 / Exercise 11.6
Chemistry for Engineering Students
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In addition to Robert Angus Smith’s study of acid rain and Cottrell’s precipitator, only a few warnings, acts, inventions, or publications showed an awareness of air pollution problems in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. One of them came from Svante Arrhenius (1859-1927) the Swedish chemist in Stockholm who was one of the founders of physical chemistry. In a paper published in 1896 in the Philosophical Magazine , Arrhenius pointed out that doubling the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere would produce an average temperature rise of 5-6° C. He was investigating the influence of heat-absorbing gases in the atmosphere (greenhouse effect) in response to questions that arose at meetings of the Physical Society of Stockholm on the causes of an ice age. There was one person that asked about the ice ages and what happens if we put something in the air would that make the air to warm up or what would happen. The heat of the earth goes into the air and that’s when they come up with the phrase that we are living inside a green house and that the earth is warmning up and that is what we now see today . Arrhenius did not comment on European and American industrial expansion that was putting more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, but he obviously recognized that carbon dioxide’s increased presence would lead to the atmosphere’s trapping more of Earth’s reflected heat like the glass of a greenhouse and produce a global warming. Twelve years later in 1908, Charles Steinmetz (1865-1923), a German electrical engineer who came to the United States in 1889 and was a consulting engineer for General Electric Company, issued another warning about the dangers of air pollution from burning coal in his 21-page book The Future of Electricity (1910). In a 1910 speech he urged electrical engineers to promote the use of electricity to reduce its cost and thereby provide an alternative to burning coal. This followed the establishment in Pittsburgh in 1907 of the International Association for the Prevention of Smoke

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