As a result every sober minded individual is obliged

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As a result, every sober minded individual is obliged to contribute immensely to the management of sewage waste to salvage the environment (Müller, 2000). Treatment of sewage waste should be done properly before it is released to water masses. Sewer waste (wastewater/sewage) from bathing, flushing toilet, manufacturing plants, washing sinks, and other sources can be treated before it is disposed to the rivers. The process of sewer waste treatment follows steps as indicated in fig.1 below; Fig.1 Stages of Sewer Water Treatment (Kress, 2019)
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Stage 1: SCREENING Screening is the first stage in sewage treatment. During this stage, the sewage is screened to remove large objects such as sanitary items, face wipes, cotton buds, diapers, metal and plastic objects, bottle tops, glass objects, and rags among other large objects that may damage or block the treatment equipment (Kress, 2019). Also, special equipment is used to remove any grit that may be washed to the sewer. The core purpose of this stage is to set the foundation for the rest of the stage. It is imperative that screening is done perfectly to ensure that any grit or large objects are not passed to the settlement tanks. Stage 2: PRIMARY TREATMENT The primary treatment stage involves separating human waste and other organic substantial matters from the sewer water. The sewage is passed through large settlement tanks to allow the solids to settle or sink to the bottoms of tanks. The solids are known as sludge upon settlement and are removed using large scrappers ( Arévalo, C., & Lázaro Marín, L., 2016 ). Continuous scrapping of the tank floors pushes the sludge to the center from where it is pumped away for further treatment and the remaining water moves to secondary treatment chambers. Stage 3: SECONDARY TREATMENT At secondary treatment, the sewer water is transferred to large rectangular tanks known as recreation lanes. Air is then pumped into the water to catalyze the breakdown of sludge that may have escaped the scrapping process into tiny bits by bacteria (Müller, 2000). Stage 4: THE FINAL TREATMENT After secondary treatment, the partially treated sewer water is pumped through a settlement tank. The sludge formed at the bottom of the tank following bacterial action is scrapped and for treatment. At this stage, the sewer water is partially free from chemicals and
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other harmful substances ( World Health Organization, 2015 ). It is thus allowed to flow over a wall for filtration via a bed of sand to remove additional particles that may be present. After filtration, the sewer water is discharged into water bodies such as rivers, seas, oceans, or lakes.
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  • Spring '11
  • Robbin
  • Sewage treatment, World Health Organization, Lázaro Marín

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