Icons view There are a number of icon views that display files and folders in

Icons view there are a number of icon views that

This preview shows page 31 - 33 out of 92 pages.

Icons view: There are a number of icon views that display files and folders in sizes ranging from small to extra-large. In most icon views, the folders are displayed as Live Icons. Live Icons allow you to preview the actual contents of a specific folder without opening the folder. Large Icons view is the best view to use if your folder contains picture files because you can see a bit of the actual images peeking out of the folder. It’s also good to use if your folder contains PowerPoint presentations 31
because the title slide of the presentation will display, making it easier for you to distinguish among presentations. Naming Files: File name—uniquely identified, Extension, or file type, Naming conventions, Up to 255 characters The first part of a file, or the file name, is generally the name you assign to the file when you save it. For example, “bioreport” may be the name you assign a report you have completed for a biology class. In a Windows application, an extension or file type, follows the file name and a period or dot (.). Like a last name, this extension identifies what kind of family of files the file belongs to, or which application should be used to read the file. For example, if “bioreport” is a spreadsheet created in Microsoft Excel 2016, it has an .xlsx extension and its name is “bioreport.xlsx.” You can choose to display file extensions by checking or unchecking the File name extensions box in the Show/hide group on the View tab in File Explorer. When you save a file created in most applications running under the Windows OS, you don’t need to add the extension to the file name; it is added automatically for you. Mac and Linux operating systems don’t require file extensions. This is because the information as to the type of application the computer should use to open the file is stored inside the file itself. However, if you’re using the Mac or Linux OS and will be sending files to Windows users, you should add an extension to your file name so that Windows can more easily open your files. The Recycle Bin is a folder on the desktop, represented by an icon that looks like a recycling bin, where files deleted from the hard drive reside until you permanently purge them from your system. Unfortunately, files deleted from other drives don’t go to the Recycle Bin but are deleted from the system immediately. In addition, files stored in the cloud are not cycled through the Recycle Bin. When you delete a file from a thumb drive or a network drive, consider it gone forever! Mac systems have something similar to the Recycle Bin, called Trash, which is represented by a wastebasket icon. To delete files on a Mac, drag the files to the Trash icon. Files placed in the Recycle Bin or the Trash remain in the system until they’re permanently deleted. To delete files from the Recycle Bin permanently, select Empty Recycle Bin after right-clicking the desktop icon. On Macs, select Empty Trash from the Finder menu in OS X.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture