Scarce silent freedom concrete rebellious peaceful

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scarcesilentfreedomconcreterebelliouspeacefulpoorsecretiveseparationotherworldly70. juncture__________71. copious__________72. mundane__________73. turbulent__________74. vocal__________75. docile__________76. intangible__________77. opulent__________78. candid__________79. servitude__________Green, Tamara M.. The Greek & Latin Roots of English, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014. ProQuest Ebook Central, .Created from huntercollege-ebooks on 2017-09-26 17:13:41.Copyright © 2014. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. All rights reserved.
Footnotes1. These Latin endings are actually derived from Greek suffixes and are most often used to form learned borrowings(seenote 5 below) in English.2. A participle is a verb form used as an adjective; the present active participle is formed most often in English by adding thesuffix -ingto the basic form of the verb—e.g., the running man, the smiling woman, the driving rain. Because Latin participlesare adjectives, they can be declined and have number. All present participles belong to the third declension.3. The fourth principal part of the verb, from which the perfect passive stem is derived, is also a participle, but passive inmeaning, and refers to some event that happened in the past. It is most often expressed in English by the suffixes -edand -en:e.g., scrambled eggs(eggs that have been scrambled), broken leg(a leg that has been broken), or a married man(a man whohas been married). Although the stem has a passive meaning, it can take on an active meaning when a suffix is added (seeexamples above).4. Note that in compounds formed from a noun or adjective together with -ficioor -cipio, the final -iof the verb stem oftendisappears.5. A learned borrowing is a word based on a Greek or Latin root, but given a meaning that it did not have in Latin or AncientGreek—e.g., telephone, which is formed from the ancient Greek words tele-(from a distance) and phone(sound). TheGreeks of the fifth century BCE obviously did not have telephones, but because of the high esteem in which classical learningwas held, the ancient Greek language was used to name this nineteenth-century invention.6. Some verbs do not have a perfect passive system.7. In this, and in all following exercises, a blank represents the literal definition of the italicized word or part of the word. Inthe context of these exercises, the literal meaning of a word or part of a word is the original meaning of the Greek or Latin root.Green, Tamara M.. The Greek & Latin Roots of English, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014. ProQuest Ebook Central, .Created from huntercollege-ebooks on 2017-09-26 17:13:41.Copyright © 2014. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. All rights reserved.

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