Michael Matthews Bigger Leaner Stronger The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body.pdf

A good rule of thumb is that the forward motion of

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A good rule of thumb is that the forward motion of the knees should occur in the first third or half of the descent, and they should go no further than just in front of the toes. Once the knees are out of the way and in place, the movement becomes a simple drop of the hips straight down followed by a rise straight up. The bottom of the squat is the point where your hips are back and slightly lower than your kneecaps (which causes your femurs to be a little lower than parallel with the ground). Your knees are just a little forward of the toes and the back is straight, but not necessarily arched, and at an angle that places the bar over the middle of the foot. I recommend that you practice this movement with no bar to get a feel for it. If you want to score bonus points, put yourself on camera so you can ensure that what you think you’re doing is actually what you’re doing. Once you’ve reached the bottom of the squat, you drive your butt straight up— not forward—and raise your shoulders at the same pace. To do this, you must maintain a back angle that keeps the weight over the middle of your foot. If your hips rise faster than your shoulders, you’ll start tipping forward, which puts heavy strain on the neck and back.
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Don’t think about anything but driving your hips straight up while keeping your chest up and maintaining the proper spine angle, and you’ll ascend correctly. Squat Tips If you’re having trouble getting your knees to remain in line with your feet as you descend and ascend, you can do a simple mobility exercise that works like this: squat with no weight and, at the bottom, place your elbows against your knees and the palms of your hands together, and nudge your knees out. Work your knees in and out for a good 20 to 30 seconds, rest, and repeat this a few times. If you do this several times per week, you’ll quickly notice a difference in your ability to maintain the proper position when you start adding weight. If you need to place the bar a bit higher on your back due to shoulder stiffness, the angles change slightly. Here’s another diagram to help:
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The figure on the left is in what’s called a “high-bar squat” position, and the right is the “low-bar squat” position, which I prefer. While the low-bar squatting position produces less torque on the knees than the high-bar position, the magnitude of both forces are well within tolerable ranges, making neither position “better” than the other in this regard. 11 Use whichever squatting position is most comfortable for you. Squatting too rapidly increases the shearing and compressive forces placed on your knees. 12 Make sure your descent is controlled—don’t simply drop your hips as quickly as you can. Take a deep breath at the top of the first rep—when you’re standing tall—and hold it, tightening your entire torso. You can hold your breath as you perform the rep or exhale slightly (maybe 10 percent of the air you’re holding) on the way up, and then fill up with air again at the top.
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  • Winter '17
  • Santos O'Neill Garcia
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