spider and its prey boil down to the poems underlying meaning How can evil

Spider and its prey boil down to the poems underlying

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spider and its prey, boil down to the poem's underlying meaning: How can evil exist in a world if the world in its entirety is governed by God? Delving deeper, one can see that this question informs the first stanza as well as the last. The spider, initially described as being white, the colour of innocence, reveals itself wicked. Frost uses the image of this white spider on a "white heal-all" as a metaphor for the evil that is tarnishing the world that is supposedly created in God's image. That
Poetry 2015– Sample EssaysiNotes.iePage 25is to say, Frost uses the "white heal-all" as a metaphor for the world as created in God's image, the moth being included in this supposedly innate innocence, while the spider represents the malevolence hidden within it. The choice of flower, a "white heal-all," further adds a layer of irony as death is occurring on a flower with medicinal capabilities. This irony further informs the metaphor, and this the meaning of this image. Frost ultimately asks whether God could really be governing the actions of this spider, a minutia in the world as a whole. If God does not govern this workings of this spider, who is to say that God governs and oversees the workings of people? The spider and the moth, then, both represent peoples in the world, the flower representing the Earth. This idea begins to counter all notions of God we have, that perhaps God is not really looking over our every action. Perhaps people are as minute in his eyes as the spider: something to be overlooked. Lionel Trilling dubbed Robert Frost as " a terrifying poet" for Frost's poetry tends to portray man as a helpless pygmy in front of the huge might and complexity of the world that surrounds him. Man can neither look far nor deep enough to understand and make sense of the incomprehensible complexity and design that pervades & permeates the world. Lionel's may not be an entirely fair or an appropriate description of Frost's poetry but the fact remains that Frost is far more realistic and blunt in stating the truth than most other poets. Frost knows that expecting evil at dark places alone is being naive. One may be caught unawares even at the most unexpected places. Think not that black is the lone colour representing evil as white too has the power to disturb & startle you unexpectedly. "Design" is a poem of finding evil in innocence, a song of experience, though the voice is hardly that of Blake’s child-like singer. At first we hear the cheerfully observant walker on back-country roads: ‘I found a dimpled . . .’ The iambic lilt adds a tone of pleasant surprise: ‘I found a dimpled darling’—‘Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet!’ But in ‘spider’ the voice betrays itself, and in ‘fat’ and ‘white’ the dimpled creature appears less charming. On a small scale the first line, like the whole poem, builds up a joke in tone, rhythm, and image that grows into a ‘joke’ of another sort.

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