Such passages as romans 917 where jehovah raised up

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 12 pages.

is wrong. Such passages as Romans 9:17, where Jehovah “raised up” Pharaoh, must be interpreted in this light. Second, providence is implemented in harmony with Heaven’s will as revealed in the Scriptures. This means, to cite just one example, that since God has revealed the conditions for the remission of alien sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38), one never should surmise that providence works in saving him in some other fashion. This is a most crucial point. (2) Divine providence does not negate man’s freedom of will. As an amplification of the forego- ing proposition, it must be stressed that providence never will overthrow one’s personal will power. Con- trary to the theological determinism of Augustine and Calvin (i.e., the notion that man is so depraved in sin that he has lost his power of choice), the Bible teaches the freedom of the human will (Matthew 23:37; John 5:39-40; Revelation 22:17). By His providence, therefore, God will not coerce a person to do either evil or good, but He can use people to accomplish the divine purpose in either capacity. Note these exam- ples: (a) Because the wicked Assyrian “had it in his heart to destroy,” Jehovah used him as an instrument (b) The Chaldeans were a “bitter and hasty nation,” marching across the Earth to possess dwelling of wrath upon ancient Israel (cf. Isaiah 10:5-7). places not theirs. They were terrible, dreadful, and violent; yet, God used them to punish His rebellious people. The Lord said of His purpose to bring Babylon against Judah, “I am working a work in your days,
- 4 - which ye will not believe though it be told you” (cf. Habakkuk 1:5-11). God said, “ I am doing this! ” Yet He used those who were disposed to evil to accomplish the task. (c) Again, to use the example of Pharaoh, when that base monarch decided to “harden his heart” and (d) Near the end of Jesus’ ministry, the Jewish rulers gathered to consider the fate of the Lord. On rebel against God (Exodus 8:15; 9:34), the Lord determined to use him and so said, “for this cause have I made thee [Pharaoh] to stand, to show thee my power, and that my name may be declared throughout all the earth” (Exodus 9:16). The decisiveness of that contest has echoed across thirty-five centuries of his- tory! this occasion, Caiaphas, the high priest that year, said to them: “Ye know nothing at all, nor do ye take account that it is expedient for you that one should die for the people, and that the whole nation perish not.” The inspired apostle John commented upon this saying, “Now this he said not of himself; but being high priest that year, he prophesied that Jesus should die for the nation; and not for the nation only, but that he might also gather together into one the children of God that are scattered abroad” (John 11:49-52). Hendriksen has noted that this cannot mean that Caiaphas was forced to say what he did. He said what he wanted to say, and the responsibility for the wicked meaning which his words conveyed remains entirely his own. Yet, in God’s wonderful providence, the choice of words was so directed that these same words were capable of expressing the gist of God’s glorious plan of salvation .... This passage

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture