For the entire book is located in the emphatic

This preview shows page 15 - 17 out of 462 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Music for Ear Training
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 5 / Exercise 1
Music for Ear Training
Horvit/Koozin
Expert Verified
for the entire book is located in the emphatic opening that “folklore means something,” in answer to the anti-intellectual popularization of folklore as ephemeral material or “mere” entertainment, and that what it means is critical to understanding how and why people express themselves. e closing words of this section, “there will always be folklore,” are
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Music for Ear Training
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 5 / Exercise 1
Music for Ear Training
Horvit/Koozin
Expert Verified
xiv e Meaning of Folklore also a resounding reminder of the pervasive theme of the book, that folklore exists for a reason: it is a social and psychological necessity. I am grateful to Carolyn Dundes for her cooperation in this project, critical reading of the manuscript, and kindness toward me. I also bene ted from the sage counsel of Alan’s beloved colleagues Wolfgang Mieder, Jay Mechling, Elliott Oring, Ronald L. Baker, Gary Alan Fine, and Haya Bar-Itzhak, and from the re ections of his former students Rachel Lewis, Perin Gürel, Rosemary Lévy Zumwalt, and Maria Teresa Agozzino. I also bene ted from time with his daughter, Alison Dundes Renteln, who also was a collaborator with her father on several publications. Of the many dinners I shared with Dundes lled with his wit and wisdom, and commands of what to do with my life, one that stands out is a reunion of fellow travelers in Salt Lake City at the American Folklore Society in 2004, where he revealed much of himself in the company of Jan Harold Brunvand, Linda Dégh, and Patricia Turner, in addition to the usual collegial suspects I previously mentioned. Jay Mechling gave me the occasion to drop in on Alan’s classroom at Berkeley, and we gained much from the experience. Marjolein E ing Dijkstra, Peter Jan Margry, and the wonderful sta at the Meertens Institute in Amsterdam, where I was in residence in 2005, were tremendously helpful in tracking down Dundes’s European material and sharing their perceptions from what he would have undoubtedly called a European worldview. I should also recognize the many conversations I had with the late Sue Samuelson, a deep font of Dundesiana and one of his devotees, who became my colleague at Penn State. A er Dundes’s death, two spe- cial occasions lled with reminiscences of and tributes to Alan by numerous participants helped me outline the impact of his work: the Western States Folklore Society meeting held at the University of California at Berkeley in April 2006, and a symposium on folklore and American studies at Columbia University in New York City in March 2006. At Penn State, School of Humanities sta member Sue Etter graciously helped with per- missions and much more, and my colleague Michael Barton, Professor of American Studies and Social Science, suggested the title of the introduction and kindly passed along material on Dundes that he had accumulated. John Alley, executive editor at Utah State University Press, deserves special recognition for ushering the work along and de ly steering the proj- ect through various daunting channels. John Bealle enhanced this book by bringing a sharp folkloristic sensibility to his masterful cra ing of the index. At home, my wife Sally Jo

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture