G Sharing building alliances honor and blood relations are important value

G sharing building alliances honor and blood

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G. Sharing, building alliances, honor, and “blood relations” are important value systems. 505
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** Basic Similarities: Flexibility, ability to be autonomous (small tribes) yet can quickly organize as a group (larger clan groups). Kinship alliance is important and flexible. Small-scale society. Status and prestige based on ownership of animals, # of wives, and # of adult children. Reciprocity still important. FILM QUESTIONS Source: Pope Fischer, Lisa FILM: Disappearing Worlds: Masai Woman (the Masai of Kenya) (50 Minutes) *There is an Italian dubbed version available on Youtube (Le Donne Masai ), the film is also available in DVD format on Netflix. East Africa BACKGROUND: We will be seeing examples of a traditional pastoral society. Think of ways this society differs from forager society. Remember you will be given exam questions that test your understanding of these different societies. Think about the following questions while watching the film: INFRASTRUCTURE: Mode of Production 1) How would you describe the environment that these Masai people live in? 2) How do the Masai people survive? How do they obtain food and shelter? 3) What type of tools (technology) did the Masai people use? 4) (Consumption pattern) What type of items/goods do the Masai have (pastoralists) compared to the Dobe Ju'Hoansi (Foragers)? 5) How do they obtain these items? Mode of Reproduction 1) What is the population size (population density) compared to foragers? 2) How healthy were the Masai? What form of healing practices do you think they rely on and how is this reflective of the infrastructure? 3) What are some things that might affect the size of the population in pastoral societies? STRUCTURE Domestic Economy 1) What happened to the new bride after she got married? Where did she go to live? What form of post marital residence pattern is this? 2) Kinship patterns in pastoral societies tend to be unilineal -- does this look like a matrilineal society or a patrilineal society? 3) What form of marriage pattern do we see in this society (monogamy/polygamy)? 4) Why do they insult the new wife? Were the old wives jealous of the new wife? 5) How does the division of labor of the Masai compare to that of the !Kung (foragers)? What are the gender division and the status of women? What might affect the difference in status between the !Kung (foragers) and the Masai (pastoralists) 506
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6) Describe examples that illustrate the importance of kinship in this society? Political Economy 1) Does this look like the egalitarian society that we saw with the San (Foragers)? Do we see examples of stratification or status? 2) Does a woman have any power in this society? How does this form of stratification relate to the domestic economy and ultimately the infrastructure? 3) Describe the "leader" of the group?
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